Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Westerly storms warm Norway

Date:
September 6, 2012
Source:
Research Council of Norway, The
Summary:
New research indicates that storms from the west are the main reason that Norwegians can enjoy temperatures 5-10°C warmer than other places so far north. Climate researchers are casting more and more doubt on the Gulf Stream’s role as the primary cause of Norway's relatively high temperatures.

New research indicates that storms from the west are the main reason that Norwegians can enjoy temperatures 5-10°C warmer than other places so far north. Climate researchers are casting more and more doubt on the Gulf Stream's role as the primary cause of Norway's relatively high temperatures.

Related Articles


Conventional wisdom has held that when the Gulf Stream is strong and brings more warm water northwards, Norway gets warmer. But a group of researchers at the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research in Bergen caution against too readily accepting this scientific "truth."

Their research challenges the traditional thinking about what forces actually shape Norway's climate and make the country so much warmer than is typical at such a high latitude.

Less impact from the Gulf Stream

Powerful computational models can help climate researchers to understand climate better. The Bergen-based researchers have learned a great deal about global and regional climate by utilising a variety of climate models developed by various international research groups.

Several of these climate models support the conventional hypothesis that the Norwegian Sea is warmed when the Gulf Stream is strong and warm. But the researchers also experimented with models that show no such relationship. Applying a new climate model developed in Norway, they found virtually no correlation between a strong Gulf Stream and warm temperatures off the Norwegian coastline. One exception is the area in the far north, in the Barents Sea, where the transport of warm water appears to be an important factor in sea ice formation.

"We have concluded that there is no unambiguous correlation between the strength of the Gulf Stream on one side and the temperatures in the Norwegian Sea and the climate in Norway on the other," asserts Professor Tore Furevik of the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research. The professor headed a research group that received funding under the Research Council of Norway's large-scale programme on Climate Change and its Impacts in Norway (NORKLIMA) to study natural climate fluctuations in the North Atlantic.

Norwegian Sea is influential regardless

The effect of Gulf Stream notwithstanding, the Norwegian Sea plays a critical role in the shaping of the climate of Norway by absorbing vast quantities of heat from the sun in the spring and summer, and then releasing that heat into the air in the autumn and winter.

In this way the ocean contributes to the relatively mild winters primarily along the western and northern coast of Norway but also farther inland.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Research Council of Norway, The. The original article was written by Bård Amundsen/Else Lie; translation by Darren McKellep/Victoria Coleman. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Research Council of Norway, The. "Westerly storms warm Norway." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 September 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120906074031.htm>.
Research Council of Norway, The. (2012, September 6). Westerly storms warm Norway. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120906074031.htm
Research Council of Norway, The. "Westerly storms warm Norway." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120906074031.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Earth & Climate News

Monday, November 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

3D Map of Antarctic Sea Ice to Shed Light on Climate Change

3D Map of Antarctic Sea Ice to Shed Light on Climate Change

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 24, 2014) — A multinational group of scientists have released the first ever detailed, high-resolution 3-D maps of Antarctic sea ice. Using an underwater robot equipped with sonar, the researchers mapped the underside of a massive area of sea ice to gauge the impact of climate change. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Car Park Solution for Flexible Green Energy

Car Park Solution for Flexible Green Energy

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 24, 2014) — A British solar power start-up says that by covering millions of existing car park spaces around the UK with flexible solar panels, the country's power problems could be solved. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

AFP (Nov. 23, 2014) — The arable district of Kenema in Sierra Leone -- at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in May -- has been under quarantine for three months as the cocoa harvest comes in. Duration: 01:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
NY Gov. on Flood Prep: 'prepared for the Worst'

NY Gov. on Flood Prep: 'prepared for the Worst'

AP (Nov. 23, 2014) — First came the big storm. Now comes the big melt for residents of flood-prone areas around Buffalo. New York's governor says officials are preparing for the worst as the temperature is expected to rise and potentially melt several feet of snow. (Nov. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins