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Food vs. fuel: Is there surplus land for bioenergy?

Date:
October 18, 2012
Source:
Helmholtz Centre For Environmental Research - UFZ
Summary:
Scientists have discussed the concept of utilizing so called surplus land for the production of feedstock for bioenergy. They identified environmental, economic and social constraints but also options for efficient use of surplus land for bioenergy. The study provides a scientific background in support of a reassessment of land available for bioenergy feedstock production.

Biofuel production from rapeseed (also known as canola) oil.
Credit: André Künzelmann / UFZ

An interdisciplinary team of 11 scientists from seven European countries and the USA have discussed the concept of utilizing so called surplus land for the production of feedstock for bioenergy. They identified environmental, economic and social constraints but also options for efficient use of surplus land for bioenergy. The study provides a scientific background in support of a reassessment of land available for bioenergy feedstock production.

Their findings were published in the open access journal BioRisk.

Increasing demand for bioenergy feedstock is generating land-use conflicts which are currently discussed in the food vs. fuel controversy and the debate about indirect land-use change. Concepts for solving those conflicts suggest a spatial segregation of food/feed and bioenergy producing areas. It is suggested to continue producing food/feed on established agricultural land while growing dedicated energy crops on so called "surplus" land.

Confusion in the applicability of those concepts is however caused by ambiguity in the definition and characterization of surplus land as well as by uncertainties in assessments of land availability, both on the national and the global scale, and of the potential yields of bioenergy crops when grown on surplus land.

'We still have limited understanding of how much land is truly surplus and suitable for energy crop production' said Dr Dauber, the lead author of the study, 'because constraints arising from environmental and socio-economic implications of bioenergy development in those areas are often not accounted for in assessments of land availability'.

The authors suggest a thorough reassessment of land availability for bioenergy production by clarifying the terminology of surplus land and taking both constraints and options for efficient and sustainable bioenergy-land use into account. Policy recommendations for resolving conflicting land-use demands are provided.

In Dr Daubers opinion, 'factoring in the constraints, combined with creativity in utilizing the options provided by the novel cropping systems, would lead to a more sustainable and efficient development of the bioenergy sector'.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Helmholtz Centre For Environmental Research - UFZ. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jens Dauber, Chris Brown, Ana Luisa Fernando, John Finnan, Ewa Krasuska, Jens Ponitka, David Styles, Daniela Thrän, Kees Jan Van Groenigen, Martin Weih, Rainer Zah. Bioenergy from “surplus” land: environmental and socio-economic implications. BIORISK – Biodiversity and Ecosystem Risk Assessment, 2012; 7 (0): 5 DOI: 10.3897/biorisk.7.3036

Cite This Page:

Helmholtz Centre For Environmental Research - UFZ. "Food vs. fuel: Is there surplus land for bioenergy?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121018100133.htm>.
Helmholtz Centre For Environmental Research - UFZ. (2012, October 18). Food vs. fuel: Is there surplus land for bioenergy?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121018100133.htm
Helmholtz Centre For Environmental Research - UFZ. "Food vs. fuel: Is there surplus land for bioenergy?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121018100133.htm (accessed August 30, 2014).

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