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Donated human stool safely and effectively treats C. difficile infections, study suggests

Date:
October 20, 2012
Source:
Henry Ford Health System
Summary:
A novel therapy that uses donated human stool to treat the deadly and contagious C.diff infection is safe and highly effective, according to a new study. The healthy stool, when mixed with warm tap water and administered, helps to re-establish the normal intestinal flora in the patient’s gastrointestinal tract, researchers say. Researchers found that 43 of 49 patients recovered swiftly after treatment and had no adverse complications from C.difficile three months later.

A novel therapy that uses donated human stool to treat the deadly and contagious C.difficile infection is safe and highly effective, according to a Henry Ford Hospital study.

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Researchers found that 43 of 49 patients recovered swiftly after treatment and had no adverse complications from C.diff three months later. Treatment is performed either through a nasogastric tube or colonscopy on an outpatient or inpatient basis.

Mayur Ramesh, M.D., a Henry Ford Infectious Diseases physician and senior author of the study, says the treatment, while appearing unconventional, has striking results.

"More than 90 percent of the patients in our study were cured of their C.diff infection," says Dr. Ramesh. "This treatment is a viable option for patients who are not responding to conventional treatment and who want to avoid surgery."

The study was presented October 19 at the annual Infectious Diseases Society of America meeting in San Diego.

In their study, researchers evaluated 49 patients who contracted Clostridium difficile, or C.diff, a germ that causes diarrhea and other intestinal problems and is linked to 14,000 deaths annually. Symptoms include water diarrhea, fever, loss of appetite, nausea and abdominal pain and tenderness. C.diff occurs in patients taking antibiotics, and can spread from person-to-person contact or from touching contaminated equipment and objects like door knobs.

Patients with a C.diff infection are typically treated with the antibiotics metronidazole or vancomycin. However, surgery could be required to remove the infected part of the intestines. In its study, Henry Ford treated patients between May 2010 and June 2012 with a therapy called intestinal microbiota transplantation (IMT), using donated stool from a healthy family member.

Dr. Ramesh says the healthy stool, when mixed with warm tap water and administered, helps to re-establish the normal intestinal flora in the patient's gastrointestinal tract. Intestinal flora is healthy bacteria that stimulates the immune system and aids the digestion and absorption of food.

"Patients who receive treatment through a nasogastric tube don't taste or smell the stool mixture as it's administered," Dr. Ramesh says. "Patients often resume their diet within a couple hours and are feeling better within 24 hours."

Of the 49 patients, 43 fully recovered, four died of causes unrelated to C.diff, one had intestinal surgery and one had no improvement.

The study was funded by Henry Ford Hospital.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Henry Ford Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Henry Ford Health System. "Donated human stool safely and effectively treats C. difficile infections, study suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121020162445.htm>.
Henry Ford Health System. (2012, October 20). Donated human stool safely and effectively treats C. difficile infections, study suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121020162445.htm
Henry Ford Health System. "Donated human stool safely and effectively treats C. difficile infections, study suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121020162445.htm (accessed December 17, 2014).

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