Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Joint Polar Satellite System spacecraft completes delta critical design review

Date:
January 22, 2013
Source:
NASA
Summary:
The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS-1) spacecraft recently cleared its final major design review, demonstrating that spacecraft development is on track to provide critical environmental data when launched no later than the first quarter of calendar year 2017.

Artist's concept of the JPSS-1 spacecraft.
Credit: NOAA/Ball Aerospace

The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS-1) spacecraft recently cleared its final major design review, demonstrating that spacecraft development is on track to provide critical environmental data when launched no later than the first quarter of calendar year 2017.

Related Articles


A four-day delta Critical Design Review (dCDR) of work conducted by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., of Boulder, Colo., was held in December 2012 with representatives from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.; NASA Headquarters, Washington; the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington; and JPSS instrument providers.

"The JPSS-1 Spacecraft team presented a very successful delta Critical Design Review in December at the Ball Aerospace facility in Boulder, Colo.," said Bill Anselm JPSS-1 Observatory Manager. "The JPSS-1 Spacecraft delta review presented the integrity of improvements and upgrades made since then, as well as the status of the overall development. With the success of this review, the spacecraft has now been approved to proceed into implementation."

The JPSS-1 Spacecraft baseline design was established at a formal review in January 2011, and is based largely on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) spacecraft, also built by Ball Aerospace. Suomi NPP was launched in October 2011, and is now being operated by NOAA under a NASA/NOAA partnership to support NOAA's operational weather forecasting as well as NASA's Earth science research.. JPSS-1 will follow the Suomi NPP satellite to maintain continuity of weather and environmental observations.

The JPSS instruments form the backbone of space-based observations used for weather forecasting, and environmental and climate monitoring. Data and imagery obtained from JPSS will increase the timeliness, accuracy and cost-effectiveness of public warnings and forecasts of climate and weather events, reducing the potential loss of human life and property.

NOAA's Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) is the Nation's next generation polar-orbiting operational environmental satellite system. JPSS represents significant technological and scientific advances for more accurate weather forecasting to secure a more 'weather ready nation' -- thus saving more lives and property while promoting economic prosperity. JPSS provides continuity of critical Earth and environmental observations of our vast atmosphere, oceans, land, and cryosphere. NOAA, working in partnership with NASA on JPSS, ensures an unbroken series of global data for monitoring and forecasting environmental phenomena and understanding our Earth.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NASA. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NASA. "Joint Polar Satellite System spacecraft completes delta critical design review." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 January 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130122111409.htm>.
NASA. (2013, January 22). Joint Polar Satellite System spacecraft completes delta critical design review. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130122111409.htm
NASA. "Joint Polar Satellite System spacecraft completes delta critical design review." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130122111409.htm (accessed March 29, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Earth & Climate News

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Antarctic Ice Is Melting Faster Than Ever

Antarctic Ice Is Melting Faster Than Ever

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) A new study of nearly two decades of satellite data shows Antarctic ice shelves are losing more mass faster every year. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Homes Near Landslide in Washington

Raw: Homes Near Landslide in Washington

AP (Mar. 27, 2015) Aerial footage from KOMO shows several homes near a landslide in Washington. KOMO reports that at least one of the homes has been damaged. (March 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Clean-Up Follows Deadly Weather in Okla.

Clean-Up Follows Deadly Weather in Okla.

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) Gov. Mary Fallin has declared a state of emergency for 25 Oklahoma counties after powerful storms rumbled across the state causing one death, numerous injuries and widespread damage. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
At Least Four Dead After Floods in Northern Chile

At Least Four Dead After Floods in Northern Chile

Reuters - News Video Online (Mar. 26, 2015) At least four people have been killed by severe flooding in northern Chile after rains battered the Andes mountains and swept into communities below. Rob Muir reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins