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CITES makes historic decision to protect sharks and rays

Date:
March 14, 2013
Source:
Wildlife Conservation Society
Summary:
CITES plenary today accepted Committee recommendations to list five species of highly traded sharks under the CITES Appendices, along with those for the listing of both manta rays and one species of sawfish.

CITES plenary today accepted Committee recommendations to list five species of highly traded sharks under the CITES Appendices, along with those for the listing of both manta rays and one species of sawfish. Japan, backed by Gambia and India, unsuccessfully challenged the Committee decision to list the oceanic whitetip shark, while Grenada and China failed in an attempt to reopen debate on listing three hammerhead species. Colombia, Senegal, Mexico and others took the floor to defend Committee decisions to list sharks.

"We are thrilled with this result and the groundswell of government commitment that made it happen," said Amie Brautigam, Marine Policy Advisor for Wildlife Conservation Society. "These hard-fought decisions to secure CITES regulations on international trade in sharks and rays are based on a solid foundation built over two decades, and surmount the long-standing opposition to listing shark species that are taken at a commercial scale."

The oceanic whitetip shark, porbeagle, three species of hammerheads, and both manta rays -- all classified as threatened on the IUCN Red List -- will now be added to CITES Appendix II, which prompts permits to ensure exports are sustainable and legal. The only sharks listed under CITES previous to this meeting -- basking, whale, and white sharks -- are not taken in the high volumes associated with the newly listed sharks. The freshwater sawfish will be transferred from Appendix II to I, where all other sawfishes are listed, thereby completing a global ban on international commercial trade in these critically endangered species.

"We're grateful to proponent governments for recognizing the value of thriving shark and ray populations, and for championing sound proposals," said Ania Budziak, Project AWARE's Associate Director. "We're proud that the divers' voice has contributed to achieving this key milestone in shark and ray conservation."

Proponents of the various listing proposals include the 27 Member States of the EU, Australia, Brazil, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, Croatia, Ecuador, Egypt, Honduras, Mexico, and the USA. The shark and ray proposals received more than the two-thirds majority of votes necessary for adoption while the sawfish listing succeeded by consensus.

"With relief that the Committee decisions were not overturned, we now turn our focus to the essential phase of their implementation," said Sonja Fordham, President of Shark Advocates International. "We urge all Parties to recognize the urgency of the shark and ray plight and to begin this work to ensure the sustainability of international trade in newly listed species, as a matter of priority."

The German Elasmobranch Society, Humane Society International, Project AWARE, Shark Advocates International, Shark Trust, and Wildlife Conservation Society worked as a coalition to promote the shark and ray listing proposals.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wildlife Conservation Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Wildlife Conservation Society. "CITES makes historic decision to protect sharks and rays." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 March 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130314110258.htm>.
Wildlife Conservation Society. (2013, March 14). CITES makes historic decision to protect sharks and rays. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130314110258.htm
Wildlife Conservation Society. "CITES makes historic decision to protect sharks and rays." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130314110258.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

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