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Caffeine-'addicted' bacteria: Finding may lead to new decontamination methods, new medicines

Date:
March 27, 2013
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Some people may joke about living on caffeine, but scientists now have genetically engineered E. coli bacteria to do that -- literally. Their report describes bacteria being "addicted" to caffeine in a way that promises practical uses ranging from decontamination of wastewater to bioproduction of medications for asthma.

Genetically engineered bacteria are “addicted” to caffeine in a way that promises practical uses ranging from decontamination of wastewater to bioproduction of medications for asthma.
Credit: volff / Fotolia

Some people may joke about living on caffeine, but scientists now have genetically engineered E. coli bacteria to do that -- literally. Their report in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology describes bacteria being "addicted" to caffeine in a way that promises practical uses ranging from decontamination of wastewater to bioproduction of medications for asthma.

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Jeffrey E. Barrick and colleagues note that caffeine and related chemical compounds have become important water pollutants due to widespread use in coffee, soda pop, tea, energy drinks, chocolate and certain medications. These include prescription drugs for asthma and other lung diseases. The scientists knew that a natural soil bacterium, Pseudomonas putida CBB5, can actually live solely on caffeine and could be used to clean up such environmental contamination. So they set out to transfer genetic gear for metabolizing, or breaking down, caffeine from P. putida into that old workhorse of biotechnology, E. coli, which is easy to handle and grow.

The study reports their success in doing so, as well as use of the E. coli for decaffeination and measuring the caffeine content of beverages. It describes development of a synthetic packet of genes for breaking down caffeine and related compounds that can be moved easily to other microbes. When engineered into certain E. coli, the result was bacteria literally addicted to caffeine. The genetic packet could have applications beyond environmental remediation, the scientists say, citing potential use as a sensor to measure caffeine levels in beverages, in recovery of nutrient-rich byproducts of coffee processing and for the cost-effective bioproduction of medicines.

The author and co-authors acknowledge financial support from the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Iowa.


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The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Caffeine-'addicted' bacteria: Finding may lead to new decontamination methods, new medicines." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 March 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130327133523.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2013, March 27). Caffeine-'addicted' bacteria: Finding may lead to new decontamination methods, new medicines. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130327133523.htm
American Chemical Society. "Caffeine-'addicted' bacteria: Finding may lead to new decontamination methods, new medicines." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130327133523.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

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