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Sacred lotus genome sequence enlightens scientists

Date:
May 10, 2013
Source:
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Summary:
The sacred lotus is a symbol of spiritual purity and longevity. Its seeds can survive up to 1,300 years, its petals and leaves repel grime and water, and its flowers generate heat to attract pollinators. Now researchers report that they have sequenced the lotus genome. Of all the plants sequenced so far -- and there are dozens -- sacred lotus bears the closest resemblance to the ancestor of all eudicots, a broad category of flowering plants that includes apple, cabbage, cactus, coffee and tobacco.

Of all the plants sequenced so far – and there are dozens – sacred lotus bears the closest resemblance to the ancestor of all eudicots, a group of flowering plants that includes apple, cactus, coffee, cotton, peanut, poplar, soybean, sunflower, tobacco and tomato.
Credit: Photo by Jane Shen-Miller

The sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) is a symbol of spiritual purity and longevity. Its seeds can survive up to 1,300 years, its petals and leaves repel grime and water, and its flowers generate heat to attract pollinators.

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Now researchers report in the journal Genome Biology that they have sequenced the lotus genome, and the results offer insight into the heart of some of its mysteries. The sequence reveals that of all the plants sequenced so far -- and there are dozens -- sacred lotus bears the closest resemblance to the ancestor of all eudicots, a broad category of flowering plants that includes apple, cabbage, cactus, coffee, cotton, grape, melon, peanut, poplar, soybean, sunflower, tobacco and tomato.

The plant lineage that includes the sacred lotus forms a separate branch of the eudicot family tree, and so lacks a signature triplication of the genome seen in most other members of this family, said University of Illinois plant biology and Institute for Genomic Biology professor Ray Ming, who led the analysis with Jane Shen-Miller, a plant and biology professor at the University of California at Los Angeles (who germinated a 1,300-year-old sacred lotus seed); and Shaohua Li, the director of the Wuhan Botanical Garden at the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

"Whole-genome duplications -- the doubling, tripling (or more) of an organism's entire genetic endowment -- are important events in plant evolution," Ming said. Some of the duplicated genes retain their original structure and function, and so produce more of a given gene product -- a protein, for example, he said. Some gradually adapt new forms to take on new functions. If those changes are beneficial, the genes persist; if they're harmful, they disappear from the genome.

Many agricultural crops benefit from genome duplications, including banana, papaya, strawberry, sugarcane, watermelon and wheat, said Robert VanBuren, a graduate student in Ming's lab and collaborator on the study.

Although it lacks the 100 million-year-old triplication of its genome seen in most other eudicots, sacred lotus experienced a separate, whole-genome duplication about 65 million years ago, the researchers found. A large proportion of the duplicated genes (about 40 percent) have been retained, they report.

"A neat thing about the duplication is that we can look at the genes that were retained and see if they are in specific pathways," VanBuren said. The researchers found evidence that duplicated genes related to wax formation (which allows the plant to repel water and remain clean) and survival in a mineral-starved watery habitat were retained, for example.

By looking at changes in the duplicated genes, the researchers found that lotus has a slow mutation rate relative to other plants, Ming said.

These traits make lotus an ideal reference plant for the study of other eudicots, the researchers said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ray Ming, Robert VanBuren, Yanling Liu, Mei Yang, Yuepeng Han, Lei-Ting Li, Qiong Zhang, Min-Jeong Kim, Michael C Schatz, Michael Campbell, Jingping Li, John E Bowers, Haibao Tang, Eric Lyons, Ann A Ferguson, Giuseppe Narzisi, David R Nelson, Crysten E Blaby-Haas, Andrea R Gschwend, Yuannian Jiao, Joshua P Der, Fanchang Zeng, Jennifer Han, Xiang Jia Min, Karen A Hudson, Ratnesh Singh, Aleel K Grennan, Steven J Karpowicz, Jennifer R Watling, Kikukatsu Ito, Sharon A Robinson, Matthew E Hudson, Qingyi Yu, Todd C Mockler, Andrew Carroll, Yun Zheng, Ramanjulu Sunkar, Ruizong Jia, Nancy Chen, Jie Arro, Ching Man Wai, Eric Wafula, Ashley Spence, Yanni Han, Liming Xu, Jisen Zhang, Rhiannon Peery, Miranda J Haus, Wenwei Xiong, James A Walsh, Jun Wu, Ming-Li Wang, Yun J Zhu, Robert E Paull, Anne B Britt, Chunguang Du, Stephen R Downie, Mary A Schuler, Todd P Michael, Steve P Long, Donald R Ort, J .William Schopf, David R Gang, Ning Jiang, Mark Yandell, Claude W dePamphilis, Sabeeha S Merchant, Andrew H Paterson, Bob B Buchanan, Shaohua Li, Jane Shen-Miller. Genome of the long-living sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.). Genome Biology, 2013; 14 (5): R41 DOI: 10.1186/gb-2013-14-5-r41

Cite This Page:

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "Sacred lotus genome sequence enlightens scientists." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 May 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130510180252.htm>.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (2013, May 10). Sacred lotus genome sequence enlightens scientists. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130510180252.htm
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "Sacred lotus genome sequence enlightens scientists." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130510180252.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

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