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Fast new, one-step genetic engineering technology

Date:
May 22, 2013
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
A new, streamlined approach to genetic engineering drastically reduces the time and effort needed to insert new genes into bacteria, the workhorses of biotechnology, scientists are reporting. The method paves the way for more rapid development of designer microbes for drug development, environmental cleanup and other activities.

A new, streamlined approach to genetic engineering drastically reduces the time and effort needed to insert new genes into bacteria, the workhorses of biotechnology, scientists are reporting. Published in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology, the method paves the way for more rapid development of designer microbes for drug development, environmental cleanup and other activities.

Keith Shearwin and colleagues explain that placing, or integrating, a piece of the genetic material DNA into a bacterium's genome is critical for making designer bacteria. That DNA can give microbes the ability to churn out ingredients for medication, for instance, or substances that break down oil after a big spill. But current genetic engineering methods are time-consuming and involve many steps. The approaches have other limitations as well. To address those drawbacks, the researchers sought to develop a new, one-step genetic engineering technology, which they named "clonetegration," a reference to clones or copies of genes or DNA fragments.

They describe development and successful laboratory tests of clonetegration in E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium bacteria, which are used in biotechnology. The method is quick, efficient and easy to do and can integrate multiple genes at the same time. They predict that clonetegration "will become a valuable technique facilitating genetic engineering with difficult-to-clone sequences and rapid construction of synthetic biological systems."

The authors acknowledge funding from the China Scholarship Council, the National Science Foundation Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center, the Human Frontier Science Program, the Australian Research Council and a William H. Elliott Biochemistry Fellowship.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Franηois St-Pierre, Lun Cui, David G. Priest, Drew Endy, Ian B. Dodd, Keith E. Shearwin. One-Step Cloning and Chromosomal Integration of DNA. ACS Synthetic Biology, 2013; 130520162719006 DOI: 10.1021/sb400021j

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Fast new, one-step genetic engineering technology." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 May 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130522131210.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2013, May 22). Fast new, one-step genetic engineering technology. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130522131210.htm
American Chemical Society. "Fast new, one-step genetic engineering technology." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130522131210.htm (accessed July 30, 2014).

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