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Sediment trapped behind dams makes them 'hot spots' for greenhouse gas emissions

Date:
July 31, 2013
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
With the "green" reputation of large hydroelectric dams already in question, scientists are reporting that millions of smaller dams on rivers around the world make an important contribution to the greenhouse gases linked to global climate change. Their study shows that more methane than previously believed bubbles out of the water behind small dams.

With the "green" reputation of large hydroelectric dams already in question, scientists are reporting that millions of smaller dams on rivers around the world make an important contribution to the greenhouse gases linked to global climate change. Their study, showing that more methane than previously believed bubbles out of the water behind small dams, appears in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology.

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Andreas Maeck and colleagues point out that the large reservoirs of water behind the world's 50,000 large dams are a known source of methane. Like carbon dioxide, methane is one of the greenhouse gases, which trap heat near Earth's surface and contribute to global warming. Methane, however, has a warming effect 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. The methane comes from organic matter in the sediments that accumulate behind dams. That knowledge led to questions about hydroelectric power's image as a green and nonpolluting energy source. Maeck's team decided to take a look at methane releases from the water impoundments behind smaller dams that store water less than 50 feet deep.

They describe analysis of methane release from water impounded behind six small dams on a European river. "Our results suggest that sedimentation-driven methane emissions from dammed river hot spot sites can potentially increase global freshwater emissions by up to 7 percent," said the report. It noted that such emissions are likely to increase due to a boom in dam construction fostered by the quest for new energy sources and water shortages.

The authors acknowledge funding from the German Research Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Andreas Maeck, Tonya DelSontro, Daniel F. McGinnis, Helmut Fischer, Sabine Flury, Mark Schmidt, Peer Fietzek, Andreas Lorke. Sediment Trapping by Dams Creates Methane Emission Hot Spots. Environmental Science & Technology, 2013; 130715152553007 DOI: 10.1021/es4003907

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Sediment trapped behind dams makes them 'hot spots' for greenhouse gas emissions." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 July 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130731122831.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2013, July 31). Sediment trapped behind dams makes them 'hot spots' for greenhouse gas emissions. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130731122831.htm
American Chemical Society. "Sediment trapped behind dams makes them 'hot spots' for greenhouse gas emissions." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130731122831.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

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