Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Dengue fever, chikungunya: A potential vector discovered in Mayotte

Date:
September 23, 2013
Source:
Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD)
Summary:
Stegomyia pia indeed has the potential to transmit serious viral diseases like dengue fever and chikungunya, which are rampant in the Indian Ocean and the Pacific. The species is known for transmitting infections through their bite. As the inventory was mainly based on aquatic larvae stages outside of the epidemic period, the scientists were not able to capture Stegomyia pia carrying one of these viruses in order to demonstrate its vector capacity, but grave suspicions surround this new species.

Stegomyia pia male, belonging to the new specie presumed vector of dengue and chikungunya in Mayotte.
Credit: © IRD / V. Robert

An unexpected discovery

Related Articles


The researchers went through the entire island with a fine-tooth comb in search of the slightest mosquito or larva. Their goal was to establish a complete inventory of Mahoran species. Thanks to detailed morphological studies and molecular sequencing of the collected specimens, entomologists were able to assemble a substantial diversity of species considering the small size of the region (376 km²). They listed 4 species of Stegomyia mosquito hitherto unknown, which they named Stegomyia pia. Its shiny black body is adorned with shimmering silvery or yellow scales – “pia” means “pretty” in Shimaore, the language of Mayotte. A pest in a flattering disguise…

Strong suspicions surround the new species

Stegomyia pia indeed has the potential to transmit serious viral diseases like dengue fever and chikungunya, which are rampant in the Indian Ocean and the Pacific. It belongs to the same group as Aedes aegypti as well as Aedes albopictus, better known as the tiger mosquito. The species in this group are not only very similar in a morphological and physiological respect, but also have many life-cycle traits in common: preferred breeding areas for larvae, feeding habits, and longevity. All of them are known for transmitting infections through their bite. As the inventory was mainly based on aquatic larvae stages outside of the epidemic period, the scientists were not able to capture Stegomyia pia carrying one of these viruses in order to demonstrate its vector capacity, but grave suspicions surround this new species.

Learning more about transmitter mosquitoes

The 4th species of Stegomyia in Mayotte appears to be endemic to the island: researchers have established that Stegomyia pia is an indigenous species, in other words not introduced from another region like its cousin the “tiger mosquito”, which comes from Southeast Asia. It seems to be a relatively abundant species, as it was identified in 6% of the 420 sampling sites, mainly in small amounts of water that collect in holes left by chopped trees and bamboo. The discovery of this new Mahoran species, a suspected vector, will tell researchers more about the mosquitoes that need to be dealt with, including their particular traits, behaviour and feeding habits, in order better to prevent the risk of transmission of the diseases. The research teams are now assessing the mosquito’s vector capacity and female adults’ preferences when it comes to hunting for blood.

Did you know?

Mayotte is a French overseas department and region (DROM) in the Indian Ocean. It forms part of the Comoros archipelago and is situated 250 km to the west of Madagascar. The island is densely populated, with more than 210,000 inhabitants.

Due to its geographic location and tropical climate, Mayotte is exposed to numerous health threats, in particular the risk of dengue fever and chikungunya epidemics. Chikungunya appeared there in 2004-2005. The year 2010 was marked by an epidemic of dengue fever and chikungunya. In 2012, 43 cases of dengue fever and a few cases of chikungunya were identified in Mayotte.

The symptoms of dengue fever and chikungunya include fever, headaches, vomiting, joint and muscle pains, contusions, and even haemorrhage. No treatment or vaccine has yet been found.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD). "Dengue fever, chikungunya: A potential vector discovered in Mayotte." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 September 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130923101952.htm>.
Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD). (2013, September 23). Dengue fever, chikungunya: A potential vector discovered in Mayotte. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130923101952.htm
Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD). "Dengue fever, chikungunya: A potential vector discovered in Mayotte." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130923101952.htm (accessed January 31, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Saturday, January 31, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Nanoscale Sensor Could Help Wine Producers and Clinical Scientists

Nanoscale Sensor Could Help Wine Producers and Clinical Scientists

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 30, 2015) — A nanosensor that mimics the oral effects and sensations of drinking wine has been developed by Danish and Portuguese researchers. Jim Drury saw it in operation. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dog-Loving Astronaut Wins Best Photo of 2015

Dog-Loving Astronaut Wins Best Photo of 2015

Buzz60 (Jan. 30, 2015) — Retired astronaut and television host, Leland Melvin, snuck his dogs into the NASA studio so they could be in his official photo. As Mara Montalbano (@maramontalbano) shows us, the secret is out. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.S. Wants to Analyze DNA from 1 Million People

U.S. Wants to Analyze DNA from 1 Million People

Reuters - US Online Video (Jan. 30, 2015) — The U.S. has proposed analyzing genetic information from more than 1 million American volunteers to learn how genetic variants affect health and disease. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Rarest Cat on Planet Caught Attacking Monkeys on Camera

Rarest Cat on Planet Caught Attacking Monkeys on Camera

Buzz60 (Jan. 30, 2015) — An African Golden Cat, the rarest large cat on the planet was recently caught on camera by scientists trying to study monkeys. The cat comes out of nowhere to attack those monkeys. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) has the rest. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins