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A brooding marine worm found in Antarctica

Date:
November 27, 2013
Source:
Universidad de Barcelona
Summary:
Brooding is a usual behavior in animals. However, to observe it in a marine worm is exceptional and, more surprisingly, it guards eggs from external threats.

The study describes the unusual reproductive strategy of the species Antarctonemertes riesgoae.
Credit: Sergi Taboada, UB

Brooding is a usual behavior in animals. However, to observe it in a marine worm is exceptional and, more surprisingly, it guards eggs from external threats. The scientific finding, published recently in the journal Polar Biology, was developed by researchers Conxita Ŕvila and Sergio Taboada, from the Department of Animal Biology of the University of Barcelona (UB) and members of the Institute of Research in Biodiversity (IRBio); Juan Junoy, from the University of Alcalá; Javier Cristobo, from the Spanish Institute of Oceanography, and Gonzalo Giribet and Sónia Andrade, from the Harvard Univesity, among other experts.

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Nemerteans are a group of invertebrates mainly found in marine waters. The research group led by Professor Ŕvila, who coordinates the project Actiquim developed in Antarctica, discovered a new species of nemerteans, Antarctonemertes riesgoae, which has a reproductive strategy unique in this group: it broods like hens.

In marine Antarctic waters, UB experts found some 2-3 cm long cocoons brooded by female nemerteans. During reproduction, females secrete a very dense mucous through the body wall; it solidifies when getting in touch with marine water until creating then an elastic layer. Once the cocoon is created, females lay eggs on it. Unexpectedly, they act in a non-passive way: when cocoons are disturbed, females show a defensive behavior and go out through cocoons' openings.

Egg brooding increases reproductive success

Generally, nemerteans, like other living beings, lay eggs but later they do not brood them. To date, only two nemertean species were known to brood eggs. According to the research group, this exceptional behavior is due to extreme Antarctic weather conditions. The strategy may result in an increase of reproductive success for many Antarctic species which can only reproduce themselves during the polar summer.

Actiquim project

It is important to remember that the group led by Professor Conxita Ŕvila participated in the discovery of a new species of Osedax, a bone-eating marine invertebrate, named Osedax deceptionensis. This species, together with the so-called Osedax antarcticus, are the two first species of this type of marine worm found in Antarctica. Professor Conxita Ŕvila has coordinated the project Actiquim (I and II) since its setting up in 2007. The project is funded by the former Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation. Its main objective is to analyze chemical ecology in marine invertebrates which inhabit Antarctic waters.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Universidad de Barcelona. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Sergi Taboada, Juan Junoy, Sónia C. S. Andrade, Gonzalo Giribet, Javier Cristobo, Conxita Avila. On the identity of two Antarctic brooding nemerteans: redescription of Antarctonemertes valida (Bürger, 1893) and description of a new species in the genus Antarctonemertes Friedrich, 1955 (Nemertea, Hoplonemertea). Polar Biology, October 2013

Cite This Page:

Universidad de Barcelona. "A brooding marine worm found in Antarctica." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131127110349.htm>.
Universidad de Barcelona. (2013, November 27). A brooding marine worm found in Antarctica. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131127110349.htm
Universidad de Barcelona. "A brooding marine worm found in Antarctica." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131127110349.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

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