Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Endocrine disruptors start a medical revolution: From alligators to humans

Date:
January 5, 2014
Source:
Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB)
Summary:
Early studies of alligators led biologists to realize that something in the environment was affecting their reproduction. Juvenile female alligators had malformed ovaries, while males had lower than average testosterone levels and a small penis. Researchers have discovered that the changes were caused by environmental contaminants, which were acting as endocrine disruptors.

Researchers found that juvenile female alligators had malformed ovaries, while males had lower than average testosterone levels and a small penis. The changes were caused by environmental contaminants, which were acting as endocrine disruptors.
Credit: picturin / Fotolia

Dr. Lou Guillette Jr. began studying the evolution of lizard reproduction more than 40 years ago. He never expected that reptiles would point him in the direction of a worldwide environmental challenge: endocrine disruption. Speaking at the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology's annual meeting in Austin, Dr. Guillette explained how his basic research on animals has brought him and others to recognize the environmental challenges to human health.

Early studies of alligators led Dr. Guillette to realize that something in the environment was affecting their reproduction. Juvenile female alligators had malformed ovaries, while males had lower than average testosterone levels and a small penis. He and his colleagues discovered that the changes were caused by environmental contaminants, which were acting as endocrine disruptors.

The endocrine system is one of the body's most important internal communication systems. It is how cells tell each other what to do to keep everything working correctly. Hormones are the messengers of the endocrine system, running back and forth among cells carrying their instructions. Disrupting normal endocrine function can have serious repercussions for health.

According to Dr. Guillette, the way hormones create different effects in the body is like music. "Think about all of the ways you could play 'Twinkle Twinkle Little Star' and you could still understand that it is 'Twinkle Twinkle Little Star'. You could make the notes loud, or play them softer. You could play them slower or faster…Each one of us is a little bit different. We each play 'Twinkle Twinkle Little Star' a little bit differently." As long as the body recognizes the message, the "music" played by its chemical messengers, it works correctly.

The idea of endocrine messages as music also describes the effect of environmental contaminants that act as endocrine disruptors. "If 'Twinkle Twinkle Little Star' is so loud that it no longer is music, it's noise, or if it's so soft that you can't hear it, now all of the sudden, that's not good." Contaminants can cause either of these situations, breaking down the harmony of the body's communication systems. If the body is overwhelmed with false messengers, or blocked from receiving its own messengers, it won't be able to function properly. If other chemicals interact with the body's own chemicals in unexpected ways, they confuse cells, and provide them with incorrect instructions.

How did researchers find these endocrine effects in alligators and other wildlife before humans? The alligators are what Dr. Guillette calls a "sentinel" species. At the top of the food chain, alligators accumulate contaminants faster than other animals. And the effects of those contaminants on alligators point researchers, like Guillette, to how they may affect people.

The National Institutes of Environmental Health Science lists over a thousand chemicals that appear to be endocrine disruptors, and Dr. Guillette and researchers around the world are only beginning to uncover the extent to which these endocrine disruptors affect human health. Pesticides, flame retardants, metals, even the nitrates in fertilizer can be endocrine disruptors. "Our bodies are actually being bombarded with thousands of chemicals every day. Some of those are natural products but many of them are compounds that we've introduced into the environment, and many of them are biologically active. It's not just one or two chemicals, but whole classes of compounds." Some like DDT are restricted, but researchers are only starting to realize how other chemicals, like phthalates found in everything from nutritional supplements to children's toys, may be affecting human health.

Dr. Guillette believes this new appreciation of how the environment -- and not just genetics or germs -- affects health is ushering in a revolution in medicine. "There's still a perception that somehow we're going to find a gene that cures cancer, or there's a gene for Alzheimer's; the reality is that what we're doing is we're messing with the language or music of genes. Environmental contaminants, or even other kinds of environmental factors -- if you don't eat the right food, you have too much stress--all of those change the music. That alteration, of course, can lead to health or disease."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB). "Endocrine disruptors start a medical revolution: From alligators to humans." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140105102505.htm>.
Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB). (2014, January 5). Endocrine disruptors start a medical revolution: From alligators to humans. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140105102505.htm
Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB). "Endocrine disruptors start a medical revolution: From alligators to humans." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140105102505.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com
$23.6 Billion Awarded To Widow In Smoking Lawsuit

$23.6 Billion Awarded To Widow In Smoking Lawsuit

Newsy (July 20, 2014) Cynthia Robinson claims R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company hid the health and addiction risks of its products, leading to the death of her husband in 1996. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tooth Plaque Provides Insight Into Diets Of Ancient People

Tooth Plaque Provides Insight Into Diets Of Ancient People

Newsy (July 19, 2014) Research on plaque from ancient teeth shows that our prehistoric ancestor's had a detailed understanding of plants long before developing agriculture. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Contaminated Water Kills 3 Babies in South African Town

Contaminated Water Kills 3 Babies in South African Town

AFP (July 18, 2014) Contaminated water in South Africa's northwestern town of Bloemhof kills three babies and hospitalises over 500 people. The incident highlights growing fears over water safety in South Africa. Duration: 02:22 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins