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Mitochondrial genes matter for survival and reproduction

Date:
January 14, 2014
Source:
Uppsala Universitet
Summary:
Contrary to common belief, mitochondrial genes seem to matter for how well individuals survive and reproduce. These new results are reported by researchers who studied the genes of a common beetle species. Mitochondria are vital power plants of cells. They carry their own genes, which are inherited only through females, and these genes vary greatly between individuals. Scientists have shown for the first time that differences in the mitochondrial genes that individuals carry actually affect how well they survive and reproduce.

Seed beetles of the species Callosobruchus maculatus. Contrary to common belief, mitochondrial genes seem to matter for how well individuals survive and reproduce. These new results are reported by researchers at Uppsala University, Sweden, who studied the genes of a common beetle species.
Credit: Gφran Arnqvist

Contrary to common belief, mitochondrial genes seem to matter for how well individuals survive and reproduce. These new results are reported by researchers at Uppsala University who studied the genes of a common beetle species.

Mitochondria are vital power plants of cells. They carry their own genes, which are inherited only through females, and these genes vary greatly between individuals. In the latest issue of the scientific journal Ecology Letters, researchers from Uppsala University show for the first time that differences in the mitochondrial genes that individuals carry actually affect how well they survive and reproduce.

It took the researchers two years to conduct the experiments, where they followed 180 populations of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus for more than 10 generations. The study was financed by the European Research Council and the Swedish Research Council and the results are based on gene sequence data from more than 2000 individuals.

Remarkably, the authors found that individuals who carried rare mitochondrial genes were consistently those who did best.

"This provides an explanation for why genetic variation is maintained, much like a pendulum of a clock will never stop in either of the extreme ... positions," says Professor Gφran Arnqvist, one of the authors of the study.

For decades, much biological research has rested on the assumption that different variants of the same mitochondrial gene are equivalent in terms of function of the gene. These genes have therefore been extensively used as a neutral "markers" that allow, for example, determination the size of populations or reconstructions of the history of immigration into an area. The authors of the new study point out that this usage is very problematic indeed if different versions of the same mitochondrial gene are not functionally equivalent.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Uppsala Universitet. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Erem Kazancıoğlu, Gφran Arnqvist. The maintenance of mitochondrial genetic variation by negative frequency-dependent selection. Ecology Letters, 2014; 17 (1): 22 DOI: 10.1111/ele.12195

Cite This Page:

Uppsala Universitet. "Mitochondrial genes matter for survival and reproduction." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140114090820.htm>.
Uppsala Universitet. (2014, January 14). Mitochondrial genes matter for survival and reproduction. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140114090820.htm
Uppsala Universitet. "Mitochondrial genes matter for survival and reproduction." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140114090820.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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