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Theory behind popular blood-type diet debunked

Date:
January 15, 2014
Source:
University of Toronto
Summary:
Researchers have found that the theory behind the popular blood type diet -- which claims an individual’s nutritional needs vary by blood type -- is not valid.

Healthy eating habits can help you lose weight, but the success of your diet has nothing to do with your blood type, researchers found.
Credit: © Aleksei Potov / Fotolia

Researchers from the University of Toronto (U of T) have found that the theory behind the popular blood type diet--which claims an individual's nutritional needs vary by blood type--is not valid. The findings are published this week in PLoS One.

"Based on the data of 1,455 study participants, we found no evidence to support the 'blood-type' diet theory," said the senior author of the study, Dr. Ahmed El-Sohemy, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Nutrigenomics at the U of T.

"The way an individual responds to any one of these diets has absolutely nothing to do with their blood type and has everything to do with their ability to stick to a sensible vegetarian or low-carbohydrate diet," said El-Sohemy.

Researchers found that the associations they observed between each of the four blood-type (A, B, AB, O) diets and the markers of health are independent of the person's blood type. The 'blood-type' diet was popularized in the book Eat Right for Your Type, written by naturopath Peter D'Adamo. The theory behind the diet is that the ABO blood type should match the dietary habits of our ancestors and people with different blood types process food differently. According to the theory, individuals adhering to a diet specific to one's blood type can improve health and decrease risk of chronic illness such as cardiovascular disease. The book was a New York Times best-seller that has been translated into 52 languages and sold over 7 million copies.

The U of T researchers took an existing population of mostly young and healthy adults who provided detailed information about their usual diets and provided fasting blood that was used to isolate DNA to determine their ABO blood type and the level of cardiometabolic risk factors, such as insulin, cholesterol and triglycerides. Diet scores were calculated based on the food items listed in Eat Right for Your Type to determine relative adherence to each of the four 'blood-type' diets.

El-Sohemy says that a previous lack of scientific evidence doesn't mean the diets didn't work. "There was just no evidence, one way or the other. It was an intriguing hypothesis so we felt we should put it to the test. We can now be confident in saying that the blood type diet hypothesis is false." Last year, a comprehensive review published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found no evidence to support the 'blood-type' diet and called for properly designed scientific studies to address it.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Toronto. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jingzhou Wang, Bibiana Garcνa-Bailo, Daiva E. Nielsen, Ahmed El-Sohemy. ABO Genotype, ‘Blood-Type’ Diet and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors. PLoS ONE, 2014; 9 (1): e84749 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0084749

Cite This Page:

University of Toronto. "Theory behind popular blood-type diet debunked." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140115172246.htm>.
University of Toronto. (2014, January 15). Theory behind popular blood-type diet debunked. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140115172246.htm
University of Toronto. "Theory behind popular blood-type diet debunked." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140115172246.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

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