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Rise in wildfires may significantly degrade future air quality, health

Date:
January 29, 2014
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
As the American West, parched by prolonged drought, braces for a season of potentially record-breaking wildfires, new research suggests these events not only pose an immediate threat to people's safety and their homes, but also could take a toll on human health, agriculture and ecosystems. The study could help societies map out a plan to mitigate these effects in wildfire-prone regions.

As the American West, parched by prolonged drought, braces for a season of potentially record-breaking wildfires, new research suggests these events not only pose an immediate threat to people's safety and their homes, but also could take a toll on human health, agriculture and ecosystems. The study, appearing in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, could help societies map out a plan to mitigate these effects in wildfire-prone regions.

Matthew D. Hurteau and colleagues point out that wildfires naturally occur in many areas around the globe. In response, human societies have harnessed the power of fire to better control wild blazes and minimize damage. But climate change also can impact the number and severity of wildfires. Understanding how these factors influence each other is crucial so that people can better prepare for the future and perhaps lessen the effects of the blazes. Previous studies have estimated the effect of climate change and population growth on wildfire patterns and the risk of damage to buildings and homes in California. Hurteau's team wanted to expand on those findings and investigate six possible future climate scenarios.

Using several different models, they estimated that by 2100, emissions from wildfires in California will grow by 19 to 101 percent. They found that climate, not population growth or development, will likely be the driving force behind these increases. However, a rise in wildfires still will mean significant societal challenges, such as higher pollution levels, which can affect human health and aggravate respiratory conditions. Poor air quality also can lower crop yield, and forest health could suffer.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Matthew D. Hurteau, Anthony L Westerling, Christine Wiedinmyer, Benjamin P Bryant. Projected effects of climate and development on California wildfire emissions through 2100. Environmental Science & Technology, 2014; 140120091746000 DOI: 10.1021/es4050133

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Rise in wildfires may significantly degrade future air quality, health." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140129115056.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2014, January 29). Rise in wildfires may significantly degrade future air quality, health. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 15, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140129115056.htm
American Chemical Society. "Rise in wildfires may significantly degrade future air quality, health." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140129115056.htm (accessed September 15, 2014).

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