Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Climate change forces flower festival forward a month since 1960s, study shows

Date:
April 2, 2014
Source:
Coventry University
Summary:
Organizers of flower festivals are being forced to adapt to increasingly early first blooming dates in spring, according to a study. The early flowering phenomenon is caused by the UK's increasingly mild springs, specifically a mean rise in March and April temperatures of 1.8 degrees Celsius since 1969.

Organizers of flower festivals are being forced to adapt to increasingly early first blooming dates in spring, according to a study by a Coventry University academic which is shortly due to be published in the journal Climate Research.

Related Articles


Professor Tim Sparks, an environmental science expert, focused on the changes made to the timing of the popular Thriplow Daffodil Weekend in Cambridgeshire since it started in 1969 and compared them to the dates of first bloom, concluding that it has been forced to bring its dates forward by 26 days over its 46 year history.

The early flowering phenomenon is caused by the UK's increasingly mild springs, specifically a mean rise in March and April temperatures of 1.8 degrees Celsius since 1969.

The study follows a report earlier this week by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which details the impacts of climate change -- identifying vulnerable people, industries, and ecosystems around the world.

Thriplow's daffodil festival -- which this year takes place on April 5th and 6th -- attracts around 10,000 visitors each year to the village, and is one of many events making up the UK's fruitful flower and tree tourism trade.

Over 300,000 has been raised for charity since the daffodil weekend started in 1969, but it has faced its fair share of challenges over the years -- such as in 1979 when just a single daffodil was in flower.

Unusually, the date for the 2014 festival was recently rearranged backwards by two weeks in response to the abnormally cold and late spring of 2013, which the Met Office labelled the "coldest March since 1962."

Professor Sparks said:

"Plant tourism in the UK and around the world is pretty big business, ranging from smaller nature reserves to globally-renowned, country-wide cherry blossom festivals that have significant economic implications.

"This study represents one of the first solid pieces of evidence of flower tourism having to adapt to climate change. The issues faced by Thriplow are a microcosm of the wider picture, and hopefully this research will raise awareness of the need for the industry to change to meet the challenges of rising temperatures across the world."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Coventry University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Coventry University. "Climate change forces flower festival forward a month since 1960s, study shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140402095438.htm>.
Coventry University. (2014, April 2). Climate change forces flower festival forward a month since 1960s, study shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140402095438.htm
Coventry University. "Climate change forces flower festival forward a month since 1960s, study shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140402095438.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Earth & Climate News

Monday, December 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Raw: Lava Inches Closer to Highway

Raw: Lava Inches Closer to Highway

AP (Dec. 21, 2014) Officials have opened a new road on Hawaii's Big Island for drivers to take care of their daily needs if encroaching lava from Kilauea Volcano crosses a highway and cuts them off from the rest of the island. (Dec. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Scuba Diving Santa Off Florida Keys

Raw: Scuba Diving Santa Off Florida Keys

AP (Dec. 20, 2014) A scuba diving Santa Claus explored the waters of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Dive shop owner Spencer Slate makes the dive each year to help raise money for charity. (Dec. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: Better Ways to Create Jobs Than Keystone Pipeline

Obama: Better Ways to Create Jobs Than Keystone Pipeline

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) US President Barack Obama says that construction of the Keystone pipeline would have 'very little impact' on US gas prices and believes there are 'more direct ways' to create construction jobs. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Lava on Track to Hit Hawaii Market

Raw: Lava on Track to Hit Hawaii Market

AP (Dec. 19, 2014) Lava from an active volcano on Hawaii's Big Island slowed slightly but stayed on track to hit a shopping center in the small town of Pahoa. (Dec. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins