Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

First metritis vaccine protects dairy cows

Date:
April 16, 2014
Source:
Cornell University
Summary:
The first vaccines that can prevent metritis, one of the most common cattle diseases, has been developed by researchers. The infection not only harms animals and farmers’ profits, but also drives more systemic antibiotic use on dairy farms than any other disease. The new vaccines prevent metritis infection of the uterus from taking hold and reduce symptoms when it does, a prospect that could save the United States billions of dollars a year and help curb the growing epidemic of antibiotic resistance.

Dr. Rodrigo Bicalho, assistant professor of dairy production medicine at the College of Veterinary Medicine, created three vaccines in his lab that lower metritis incidence and symptoms in cows, showing promise for alternatives to antibiotics in addressing the disease.
Credit: Image courtesy of Cornell University

Cornell scientists have created the first vaccines that can prevent metritis, one of the most common cattle diseases. The infection not only harms animals and farmers' profits, but also drives more systemic antibiotic use on dairy farms than any other disease.

The new vaccines prevent metritis infection of the uterus from taking hold and reduce symptoms when it does, a prospect that could save the United States billions of dollars a year and help curb the growing epidemic of antibiotic resistance. The research was published in the journal PLOS One.

Metritis develops after a cow gives birth, when bacteria take advantage of the open vagina and cervix to settle in the uterus. Infected cows suffer fever, pain, inflammation, lack of appetite, depression and reduced reproductive abilities. Metritis affects as many as 25 percent of the roughly 9 million dairy cows in the United States, costing nearly $400 per case in lost productivity and treatment costs.

It is the number one cause of systemic antibiotic use, which floods the whole body with antibiotics rather than just a specific region, said Rodrigo Bicalho, assistant professor of dairy production medicine at the College of Veterinary Medicine. Three of the vaccines Bicalho's lab created lowered metritis incidence and lessened its symptoms in the cows that received them, showing promise for alternatives to antibiotics in addressing the disease.

"Our lab has been developing a vaccine for years now based on our research of this disease," said Bicalho. "We created multivalent vaccines, complex cocktails with several components we've identified as important to causing metritis."

Bicalho and his lab researchers tested five combinations of various ingredients and delivered three subcutaneously via a shot and two intravaginally. All three subcutaneous vaccines were effective, significantly reducing incidence of disease by up to 83 percent. Cows that were vaccinated with the subcutaneous vaccines had lower incidence of postpartum fever and puerperal metritis, shorter disease periods and improved reproductive performance compared to those that did not receive the vaccines.

"The powerful protection these vaccines produced surprised us. We expected some protective effect but nothing as strong as what we found," said Bicalho. "An effective vaccine against uterine diseases will have a significant positive impact on the dairy industry, limiting the use of antibiotics, and decreasing economic losses due to these disorders. Our next step is to simplify the complex vaccines we created by identifying which components are the most important and removing the rest."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cornell University. The original article was written by Carly Hodes. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Vinνcius Silva Machado, Marcela Luccas de Souza Bicalho, Enoch Brandγo de Souza Meira Junior, Rodolfo Rossi, Bruno Leonardo Ribeiro, Svetlana Lima, Thiago Santos, Arieli Kussler, Carla Foditsch, Erika Korzune Ganda, Georgios Oikonomou, Soon Hon Cheong, Robert Owen Gilbert, Rodrigo Carvalho Bicalho. Subcutaneous Immunization with Inactivated Bacterial Components and Purified Protein of Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes Prevents Puerperal Metritis in Holstein Dairy Cows. PLoS ONE, 2014; 9 (3): e91734 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0091734

Cite This Page:

Cornell University. "First metritis vaccine protects dairy cows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140416112716.htm>.
Cornell University. (2014, April 16). First metritis vaccine protects dairy cows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140416112716.htm
Cornell University. "First metritis vaccine protects dairy cows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140416112716.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Friday, July 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Boy Attacked by Shark in Florida

Boy Attacked by Shark in Florida

Reuters - US Online Video (July 24, 2014) — An 8-year-old boy is bitten in the leg by a shark while vacationing at a Florida beach. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Goma Cheese Brings Whiff of New Hope to DRC

Goma Cheese Brings Whiff of New Hope to DRC

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 24, 2014) — The eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo, mainly known for conflict and instability, is an unlikely place for the production of fine cheese. But a farm in the village of Masisi, in North Kivu is slowly transforming perceptions of the area. Known simply as Goma cheese, the Congolese version of Dutch gouda has gained popularity through out the region. Ciara Sutton reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dogs Appear To Become Jealous Of Owners' Attention

Dogs Appear To Become Jealous Of Owners' Attention

Newsy (July 23, 2014) — A U.C. San Diego researcher says jealousy isn't just a human trait, and dogs aren't the best at sharing the attention of humans with other dogs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Professor Creates Site Revealing Where People's Cats Live

Professor Creates Site Revealing Where People's Cats Live

Newsy (July 23, 2014) — ​It's called I Know Where Your Cat Lives, and you can keep hitting the "Random Cat" button to find more real cats all over the world. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:  

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile iPhone Android Web
          Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins