Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Bacterial adaptation contributes to pneumococcal threat in sickle cell disease patients

Date:
May 23, 2014
Source:
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Summary:
Differences in the genetic code of pneumococcal bacteria have been identified by researcher that may explain why it poses such a risk to children with sickle cell disease and why current vaccines don’t provide better protection against the infection. The findings will aid efforts to improve vaccine effectiveness and inform research into new ways to protect young sickle cell disease patients from life-threatening pneumococcal infections that can lead to pneumonia, meningitis, bloodstream infections and other problems.

Researchers have identified differences in the genetic code of pneumococcal bacteria that may explain why it poses such a risk to children with sickle cell disease and why current vaccines don't provide better protection against the infection. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which appeared earlier this month in the journal Cell Host & Microbe.

The findings will aid efforts to improve vaccine effectiveness and inform research into new ways to protect young sickle cell disease patients from life-threatening pneumococcal infections that can lead to pneumonia, meningitis, bloodstream infections and other problems. Despite advances in preventive care, including vaccination and prophylactic antibiotic therapy, pneumococcal infections still pose a serious health risk to children with sickle cell disease, who are at a much greater risk of possibly fatal infection than are members of the general public.

The results followed whole genome sequencing of hundreds of pneumococcal bacteria collected from the public and patients with sickle cell disease. The genome is carried in the DNA molecule and includes the instructions necessary to assemble and sustain life.

The analysis showed the bacteria have adapted to sickle cell patients, including measures aimed at preventing infection. As a result, disease-causing strains of the bacteria differ in children with and without sickle cell disease. For example, the pneumococcal strains collected from sickle cell patients in this study differed from the 13 pneumococcal strains included in the current vaccine recommended for children age 5 and younger.

"The results help explain why current vaccines haven't been as successful at protecting children with sickle cell disease from pneumococcal infections as they have in protecting other children," said Joshua Wolf, M.D., an assistant member of the St. Jude Department of Infectious Diseases and one of the study's lead authors. The other first authors are Robert Carter, Ph.D., of the St. Jude Computational Biology department, and Tim van Opijnen, formerly of Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, and now of Boston College.

Work is already underway on vaccines that take a different approach to priming the disease-fighting immune system to protect high-risk groups, including children with sickle cell disease, said the study's corresponding author, Jason Rosch, Ph.D., an assistant member of the St. Jude Infectious Diseases department. "These results will help guide vaccine design going forward," he said.

Sickle cell disease is caused by an inherited mutation in the gene that carries instructions for making hemoglobin. That is the protein red blood cells use to carry oxygen. The mutation leaves red blood cells prone to the sickled shape that gives the disease its name and is also responsible for the episodes of intense pain, organ damage and other problems associated with the life-shortening disease. About 300,000 infants are born with sickle cell disease each year, making it the world's most common genetic disorder.

For this study, scientists compared the genomes of 322 pneumococcal bacteria collected from sickle cell patients between 1994 and 2011 to DNA from 327 strains obtained from individuals without sickle cell disease.

The analysis revealed that over time, the genomes of bacteria isolated from sickle cell patients shrank as genes and the corresponding DNA were discarded or combined. A comparison of the bacterial genomes from individuals with and without sickle cell disease suggested the changes reflected bacterial adaptation to their sickle cell host and contributed to the bacteria's ability to persist despite advances in preventive care.

Using a technique called transposon sequencing (Tn-seq), researchers showed that the bacteria's ability to cause widespread infection in mice with and without sickle cell disease was dramatically affected by changes in 60 different bacterial genes. The results demonstrated that bacteria faced different conditions in animals with and without sickle cell disease.

When researchers checked those same genes in bacteria isolated from sickle cell patients, they found six that were missing or altered in a significant percentage of samples. The list included genes involved in transporting iron into bacteria, bacterial metabolism and other processes that are likely altered in patients with sickle cell disease.

"We demonstrated that genes necessary to cause disease in the general public are expendable in patients with sickle cell disease," Rosch said.

The same methods used in this study could also be used to better understand the genetics behind other pneumococcal high-risk groups, including in individuals who are past retirement age or are obese.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Robert Carter, Joshua Wolf, Tim vanOpijnen, Martha Muller, Caroline Obert, Corinna Burnham, Beth Mann, Yimei Li, RandallT. Hayden, Tamara Pestina, Derek Persons, Andrew Camilli, PatriciaM. Flynn, ElaineI. Tuomanen, JasonW. Rosch. Genomic Analyses of Pneumococci from Children with Sickle Cell Disease Expose Host-Specific Bacterial Adaptations and Deficits in Current Interventions. Cell Host & Microbe, 2014; 15 (5): 587 DOI: 10.1016/j.chom.2014.04.005

Cite This Page:

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. "Bacterial adaptation contributes to pneumococcal threat in sickle cell disease patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140523082501.htm>.
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. (2014, May 23). Bacterial adaptation contributes to pneumococcal threat in sickle cell disease patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140523082501.htm
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. "Bacterial adaptation contributes to pneumococcal threat in sickle cell disease patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140523082501.htm (accessed September 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

AP (Sep. 19, 2014) A federal jury has convicted three people in connection with an outbreak of salmonella poisoning five years ago that sickened hundreds of people and was linked to a number of deaths. (Sept. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins