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Stem cell scientists lay TRAP for disease

Date:
July 11, 2014
Source:
University of Southern California - Health Sciences
Summary:
A 'mouse TRAP' has been set by scientists to capture the early signs of kidney failure, as described by a recent study. Their new transgenic mouse line uses a technique called TRAP to extract cellular and genetic information from a variety of solid organs.

From right are: Jing Liu, Andy McMahon and Sanjeev Kumar.
Credit: Cristy Lytal

USC Stem Cell scientists have set a "mouse TRAP" to capture the early signs of kidney failure, as described by a recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. Their new transgenic mouse line uses a technique called TRAP to extract cellular and genetic information from a variety of solid organs.

Invented by scientists at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research in 2008, TRAP involves attaching a fluorescent tag to the protein-making machinery, or ribosomes, of the cell type of interest. Scientists can then collect the tagged ribosomes and determine which active genes are ordering proteins to be made by these ribosomes. (TRAP stands for "translating ribosome affinity purification.")

Following up on this breakthrough, the USC team -- led by Jing Liu, senior research associate in the laboratory of Andy McMahon -- has made the technique simpler and more accessible by engineering a TRAP mouse. When bred with any one of thousands of existing strains of transgenic mice, the TRAP mouse produces progeny with tagged ribosomes in specific organs or cell types.

To demonstrate how useful this can be, Liu and her colleagues used TRAP mice to tag four different types of kidney cells and identify early signals of acute kidney injury.

As a consequence of surgery, infections or drug toxicity, five to seven percent of all hospitalized patients experience acute kidney injury, which can lead to chronic kidney disease or death.

Currently, doctors can only detect acute kidney injury a full day after it occurs. The TRAP mouse enables earlier detection, which will greatly improve patients' health.

"The technology is simple, and the kidney field is very excited about our results," said Liu. "I anticipate that the TRAP mouse will advance our cellular and molecular understanding of a wide variety of diseases and injuries in many different organ systems."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Southern California - Health Sciences. The original article was written by Cristy Lytal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jing Liu, A. Michaela Krautzberger, Shannan H. Sui, Oliver M. Hofmann, Ying Chen, Manfred Baetscher, Ivica Grgic, Sanjeev Kumar, Benjamin Humphreys, Winston A. Hide, Andrew P. McMahon. Cell-specific translational profiling in acute kidney injury. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2014; 124 (3): 1242 DOI: 10.1172/JCI72126

Cite This Page:

University of Southern California - Health Sciences. "Stem cell scientists lay TRAP for disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140711153337.htm>.
University of Southern California - Health Sciences. (2014, July 11). Stem cell scientists lay TRAP for disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140711153337.htm
University of Southern California - Health Sciences. "Stem cell scientists lay TRAP for disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140711153337.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

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