Science News
from research organizations

Largest genetic survey to date shows major success of giant panda breeding programs

Date:
July 23, 2014
Source:
Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)
Summary:
Breeding programs in conservation centers and zoos hope to save the panda by improving genetic diversity, avoid inbreeding and ultimately, introduce pandas back to the wild. Just how are these high-profile programs doing so far? In a new study appearing in the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and Evolution, Fuwen Wei, et al., performed the most comprehensive genetic survey so far.
Share:
       
FULL STORY

Heroic worldwide conservation efforts have made great strides in saving China's endangered national treasure, the giant panda. Now, in China, there are over 65 giant panda reserves that have been established and three large breeding centers. But despite these efforts, just 1596 pandas remain in the wild.

Breeding programs in conservation centers and zoos hope to save the panda by improving genetic diversity, avoid inbreeding and ultimately, introduce pandas back to the wild. Just how are these high-profile programs doing so far?

In a new study appearing in the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and Evolution, Fuwen Wei, et al., performed the most comprehensive genetic survey so far. They evaluated the diversity of 240 captive giant pandas from 4 Chinese breeding centers locations (Wolong, Chengdu, Louguantai, and the Beijing zoo account for 64 percent of the 341 pandas kept in captivity).

In good news for the breeding centers, high levels of genetic diversity and low levels of inbreeding were found in the captive populations, which indicate that the whole captive population is genetically healthy, and it is therefore unnecessary to capture more wild pandas for captive breeding. However, one center, the Louguantai population, faces a higher risk of inbreeding and requires urgent attention to correct, such as scientific-based breeding pairs.

Finally, the authors recommend that selection of captive pandas for reintroduction into the wild should consider their geographic origin, genetic background and genetic contribution. By combining the new molecular genetic data with pedigree data, the authors hope that panda research centers can successfully release pandas back into the wild.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. L. Shan, Y. Hu, L. Zhu, L. Yan, C. Wang, D. Li, X. Jin, C. Zhang, F. Wei. Large-Scale Genetic Survey Provides Insights into the Captive Management and Reintroduction of Giant Pandas. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 2014; DOI: 10.1093/molbev/msu210

Cite This Page:

Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press). "Largest genetic survey to date shows major success of giant panda breeding programs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140723111226.htm>.
Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press). (2014, July 23). Largest genetic survey to date shows major success of giant panda breeding programs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140723111226.htm
Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press). "Largest genetic survey to date shows major success of giant panda breeding programs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140723111226.htm (accessed July 28, 2015).

Share This Page: