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The evolution of migration: Ancestral songbirds headed south for the winter

Date:
August 4, 2014
Source:
Field Museum
Summary:
To scientists, long distance migration still holds many mysteries, one of which is: Where did migration begin and how did it evolve? This question has long been a debated topic among scientists, but thanks to new research, we may have an answer for one of the largest groups of migratory birds.

Migrating Canada geese.
Credit: Terrance Emerson / Fotolia

Each year, millions of birds migrate thousands of miles between the locations where they breed and raise young, and the areas where they spend the winter. Each migration is a trip fraught with danger -- many birds die before they reach their final destination. To scientists, long distance migration still holds many mysteries, one of which is: where did migration begin and how did it evolve? This question has long been a debated topic among scientists, but thanks to new research from Field Museum scientists, we may have an answer for one of the largest groups of migratory birds.

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The scientists' research will be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Traditionally, there have been two schools of thought: one, that ancestors of migratory birds spent the whole year in North America and evolved migration by moving their winter range to the tropics. The other theory suggested that these ancestors were originally found in the tropics, and evolved migration by moving breeding grounds to more temperate locales like North America.

To uncover this mystery of migration Resident Graduate Student Ben Winger (University of Chicago) and Associate Curator of Botany Rick Ree created a model to infer how the breeding and winter ranges of migratory species changed through time. They applied the model to a large group of migratory birds that include warblers, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, orioles, and others. The model uses a phylogeny (a "family tree" of species that depicts their evolutionary relationships), which was contributed by co-author Keith Barker, a former Field Museum graduate student now at the University of Minnesota. "We named it the 'domino model' because the breeding and winter ranges of species were coded in 3x2 grids of binary values, like dots on domino pieces.

The computational challenge was to reconstruct the most probable evolutionary shifts from one domino to another," explains Ree. Tracing back through time and examining common ancestors of migratory and non-migratory species, they were able to conclude that there was more evidence supporting the idea that birds lived year-round in North America and began migrating further and further south, resulting in today's birds migrating thousands of miles every year.

Another result of the study suggests that many tropical species of birds are descendants of migratory ancestors that lost migration and stayed in the tropics year-round. "This is an interesting result because species diversity in this group is much higher in the tropics. Previously, more species in the tropics led to the assumption that temperate, migratory species are derived from tropical, nonmigratory ancestors; however, the results of our phylogenetic study suggest that the opposite pattern happened often in this group."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Field Museum. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Benjamin M. Winger, F. Keith Barker, and Richard H. Ree. Temperate origins of long-distance seasonal migration in New World songbirds. PNAS, August 4, 2014 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1405000111

Cite This Page:

Field Museum. "The evolution of migration: Ancestral songbirds headed south for the winter." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140804151419.htm>.
Field Museum. (2014, August 4). The evolution of migration: Ancestral songbirds headed south for the winter. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140804151419.htm
Field Museum. "The evolution of migration: Ancestral songbirds headed south for the winter." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140804151419.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

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Study Traces Evolutionary Origins of Migration in New World Birds

Aug. 4, 2014 Scientists have developed a new method to reveal the ancestral ranges of New World birds, and discovered that bird migration in the Americas evolved in species that resided in North America. Their ... read more

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