Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Magnetic substorms may sometimes be driven by different process than generally thought

Date:
September 2, 2014
Source:
Wiley
Summary:
Magnetic substorms, the disruptions in geomagnetic activity that cause brightening of aurora, may sometimes be driven by a different process than generally thought, a new study shows.

Magnetic substorms, the disruptions in geomagnetic activity that cause brightening of aurora, may sometimes be driven by a different process than generally thought, a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics shows.

Related Articles


Hwang et al. report observations using the Cluster spacecraft and ground-based magnetometers associated with the onset of a substorm. They saw two consecutive sudden jumps in the current sheet normal component of the magnetic field in the plasma sheet (the surface of dense plasma that lies approximately in Earth's equatorial plane), separated by about 5 minutes. The first magnetic field enhancement, along with a series of other magnetic structures and a region of rarefied plasma, propagated outward away from Earth; the second magnetic field enhancement (dipolarization front) rapidly propagated toward Earth.

They argue that the observed sequence of events suggests that a disruption in the current sheet originated near Earth and moved toward the magnetotail, where it facilitated magnetic reconnection (the breaking and reconnecting of magnetic field lines, which releases energy), creating conditions for substorm enhancement. This differs from the more commonly accepted scenario in which a substorm begins with magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. K.-J. Hwang, M. L. Goldstein, T. E. Moore, B. M. Walsh, D. G. Baishev, A. V. Moiseyev, B. M. Shevtsov, K. Yumoto. A tailward moving current sheet normal magnetic field front followed by an earthward moving dipolarization front. Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, 2014; 119 (7): 5316 DOI: 10.1002/2013JA019657

Cite This Page:

Wiley. "Magnetic substorms may sometimes be driven by different process than generally thought." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 September 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140902114721.htm>.
Wiley. (2014, September 2). Magnetic substorms may sometimes be driven by different process than generally thought. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140902114721.htm
Wiley. "Magnetic substorms may sometimes be driven by different process than generally thought." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140902114721.htm (accessed March 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Earth & Climate News

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Whale-Watching Scientists Spot Baby Orca

Whale-Watching Scientists Spot Baby Orca

AP (Feb. 28, 2015) Researchers following endangered killer whales spotted a baby orca off the coast of Washington state, the third birth documented this winter but still leaving the population dangerously low. (Feb. 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bridge Collapses Due to Flooding in Bolivia

Bridge Collapses Due to Flooding in Bolivia

Reuters - News Video Online (Feb. 28, 2015) Heavy rain and flooding sweep through parts of Bolivia causing damage and leaves more than 2,000 people homeless. Sophia Soo reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Death Toll from Afghan Avalanches Tops 200

Death Toll from Afghan Avalanches Tops 200

AFP (Feb. 27, 2015) More than 200 people have been killed in a series of avalanches triggered by heavy snowfall in Afghanistan. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
France, Philippines Call for Agreement on Climate Change

France, Philippines Call for Agreement on Climate Change

Reuters - News Video Online (Feb. 27, 2015) The presidents of France and the Philippines issue a joint appeal for a binding agreement on climate change. Katie Sargent reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins