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Beyond the bandages: Pediatric trauma nurses know about trauma-informed care

Date:
January 12, 2015
Source:
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Summary:
Pediatric nurses play a key role in preventing post-traumatic stress in injured children and their families by practicing "trauma-informed care". A new study surveyed pediatric trauma nurses, revealing that they are knowledgeable about practicing trauma-informed care, but need for additional training to help families cope after a child's injury.
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A recent study from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital published in the Journal of Pediatric Nursing reveals pediatric trauma nurses are knowledgeable about practicing trauma-informed care, but points to the need for additional nurse training to help families cope after a child's injury. When an injury occurs, both the child and other family members may experience traumatic stress reactions interfering with a full recovery. Pediatric nurses play a key role in preventing injury-related post-traumatic stress by providing trauma-informed care, which includes recognizing pre-existing trauma, addressing acute traumatic stress reactions associated with the traumatic event, minimizing potentially traumatic aspects of treatment, and identifying children who need additional monitoring or referrals for more help.

Researchers surveyed 232 nurses across five level I and level II pediatric trauma centers about their knowledge, opinions, and current practices in addressing psychological recovery in their injured patients. More than 90 percent of the nurses surveyed recognize the importance of attending to psychosocial needs as part of trauma nursing care, and 75 to 80 percent report that they encourage parents to turn to family and friends for support and help parents manage a child's pain and anxiety during procedures. However, far fewer nurses surveyed reported directly assessing a child or parent's distress or providing specific instruction in how to cope with difficult or painful experiences.

"When a child is hospitalized for an injury, nurses play a key role not only in medical care, but also in helping families cope and fully recover emotionally," says Nancy Kassam-Adams, PhD, a psychologist, director of the Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress at CHOP, and a lead author on the study. "Taken together with other recent studies that found only one in five trauma centers routinely screen child and youth for traumatic stress responses, these results help to identify gaps in current practice and point to possible policy and training needs."

According to one parent's experience after her son suffered severe injuries, the care he received at the hospital from the nursing staff made all the difference in his healthy recovery, both medically and emotionally. "For a long time after my son Stephen's accident, I was committed to remaining strong for him and my family and just powering us all through the crisis," says Kathy Conaboy, a member of the Center's Family Advisory Committee. "What I realized over time with the help of his nurses was that our entire family was traumatized, and we needed help that I didn't even know that I needed to ask for. We gradually learned from his nurses how to talk about what happened and to seek positive coping skills and supports to be able to move forward."

The results of this survey suggest that efforts to improve trauma-informed pediatric nursing care should highlight specific skills related to helping patients and their parents manage emotional responses to difficult medical experiences. As one nurse surveyed for the study noted: "I would like to have information about what to teach parents to say and how to talk about the event without re-traumatizing the patient."


Story Source:

Materials provided by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Nancy Kassam-Adams, Susan Rzucidlo, Marie Campbell, Grace Good, Erin Bonifacio, Kimberly Slouf, Stephanie Schneider, Christine McKenna, Carol A. Hanson, Donna Grather. Nurses' Views and Current Practice of Trauma-Informed Pediatric Nursing Care. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.pedn.2014.11.008

Cite This Page:

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "Beyond the bandages: Pediatric trauma nurses know about trauma-informed care." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 January 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150112093047.htm>.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. (2015, January 12). Beyond the bandages: Pediatric trauma nurses know about trauma-informed care. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 30, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150112093047.htm
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "Beyond the bandages: Pediatric trauma nurses know about trauma-informed care." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150112093047.htm (accessed April 30, 2017).