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Certain ARB drugs are more effective than others at treating heart failure

Date:
February 2, 2015
Source:
Nova Southeastern University
Summary:
Millions of people take angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) to help treat heart failure. But it turns out not all ARBs are created equally.
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Millions of people take angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) to help treat heart failure. But it turns out not all ARBs are created equally, according to one Nova Southeastern University (NSU) researcher's findings.

Anastasios Lymperopoulos, Ph.D., F.A.H.A., assistant professor of pharmacology at NSU's College of Pharmacy, along with his research team, conducted a study on biological models over a seven-day period that found Valsartan (Diovan) and Candesartan (Atacand) were more effective than Irbesartan (Aprovel, Karvea and Avapro) at preventing the increased production of the hormone aldosterone, which, if untreated, can lead to heart failure.

"This can help cardiologists and other clinicians tremendously when they are deciding which ARB drug to choose for the treatment of heart failure patients," Lymperopoulos said.

Aldosterone is formed by the adrenal gland through a protein called beta-arrestin1, which Lymperopoulos previously discovered. A normal level of the hormone is essential to maintaining blood volume, but elevated levels can cause hypertension (high blood pressure), cardiac fibrosis (collagen deposition in the heart muscle), hypertrophy (increased size of cells) and inflammation, all factors that can cause heart failure.

The research team consisted of Lymperopoulos`s lab at NSU, a team led by Patricia McDonald, Ph.D., at Scripps Florida, and Walter J. Koch`s, Ph.D., lab at Temple University in Philadelphia.

This work was partially supported by American Heart Association Grant No. 09SDG2010138.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Nova Southeastern University. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal References:

  1. Anastasios Lymperopoulos, Emmanuel Sturchler, Ashley Bathgate-Siryk, Samalia Dabul, Dilayda Garcia, Karlee Walklett, Giuseppe Rengo, Patricia McDonald, Walter J. Koch. Different Potencies of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers at Suppressing Adrenal β-Arrestin1–Dependent Post-Myocardial Infarction Hyperaldosteronism. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2014; 64 (25): 2805 DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2014.09.070
  2. Samalia Dabul, Ashley Bathgate-Siryk, Thairy Reyes Valero, Malika Jafferjee, Emmanuel Sturchler, Patricia McDonald, Walter J. Koch, Anastasios Lymperopoulos. Suppression of adrenal βarrestin1-dependent aldosterone production by ARBs: head-to-head comparison. Scientific Reports, 2015; 5: 8116 DOI: 10.1038/srep08116

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Nova Southeastern University. "Certain ARB drugs are more effective than others at treating heart failure." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 February 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150202212118.htm>.
Nova Southeastern University. (2015, February 2). Certain ARB drugs are more effective than others at treating heart failure. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 8, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150202212118.htm
Nova Southeastern University. "Certain ARB drugs are more effective than others at treating heart failure." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150202212118.htm (accessed May 8, 2017).