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Effect of follow-up of MGUS on survival in patients with multiple myeloma

Date:
March 5, 2015
Source:
The JAMA Network Journals
Summary:
Patients with multiple myeloma appear to have better survival if they are found to have monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance first, the state that precedes MM and which is typically diagnosed as part of a medical workup for another reason, according to a new study.
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Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) appear to have better survival if they are found to have monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) first, the state that precedes MM and which is typically diagnosed as part of a medical workup for another reason, according to a study published online by JAMA Oncology.

Most MGUS cases are never diagnosed; MGUS is characterized by a detectable M protein without evidence for end-organ damage or other related plasma cell or lymphoproliferative disorders. Only a small proportion of MGUS progresses to malignancy, with the annual risk of progression to MM or other related diseases being 0.5 percent to 1 percent on average. Current guidelines recommend, depending on a patient's risk score, lifelong monitoring of people with MGUS to detect progression to MM or related disorders, according to the study background.

Sigurdur Y. Kristinsson, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Iceland, and coauthors estimated the impact of prior knowledge of MGUS diagnosis and coexisting illnesses on MM survival. The study included all patients diagnosed with MM in Sweden (n=14,798) from 1976 to 2005; 394 patients (2.7 percent) had previously diagnosed MGUS.

Study results show that patients with prior knowledge of MGUS had better overall survival (median 2.8 years) than patients with MM who didn't know when they had MGUS (median survival 2.1 years), although patients with prior knowledge of their MGUS status had more coexisting illnesses. Low M-protein concentration at MGUS diagnosis was associated with poorer MM survival among patients with prior knowledge of MGUS.

The authors speculate the reasons for the prolonged survival in their study is that patients with MGUS are evaluated more often for signs of progression to MM and may be diagnosed and started on therapy for myeloma at an earlier stage.

"Our results reflect the importance of lifelong follow-up for individuals diagnosed as having MGUS, independent of risk score, and highlight the need for better risk models based on the biology of the disease. Patients should receive balanced information stressing not only the overall very low risk of progression to malignant neoplasm but also the symptoms that could signal such development and the need to consult their physician," the study concludes.


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Materials provided by The JAMA Network Journals. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Elin Edda Sigurdardottir, Ingemar Turesson, Sigrun Helga Lund, Ebba K. Lindqvist, Sham Mailankody, Neha Korde, Magnus Björkholm, Ola Landgren, Sigurdur Y. Kristinsson. The Role of Diagnosis and Clinical Follow-up of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance on Survival in Multiple Myeloma. JAMA Oncology, 2015; DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2015.23

Cite This Page:

The JAMA Network Journals. "Effect of follow-up of MGUS on survival in patients with multiple myeloma." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 March 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150305125525.htm>.
The JAMA Network Journals. (2015, March 5). Effect of follow-up of MGUS on survival in patients with multiple myeloma. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150305125525.htm
The JAMA Network Journals. "Effect of follow-up of MGUS on survival in patients with multiple myeloma." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150305125525.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

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