Science News
from research organizations

Diabetes drug sitagliptin shows no increased risk of heart events

Date:
June 8, 2015
Source:
Duke Medicine
Summary:
A clinical trial of the glucose-control drug sitagliptin among patients with type 2 diabetes and established cardiovascular disease has found it did not raise the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events.
Share:
FULL STORY

A clinical trial of the glucose-control drug sitagliptin among patients with type 2 diabetes and established cardiovascular disease has found it did not raise the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events.

The Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes with Sitagliptin (TECOS) study, conducted by the University of Oxford Diabetes Trials Unit (DTU) and the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI), also found no increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in people receiving sitagliptin.

The results were presented June 8, 2015, at the 75th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association meeting in Boston, and will be published online in the New England Journal of Medicine the same day. A slide set reflecting the data presented at the American Diabetes Association will be available to download from http://www.dtu.ox.ac.uk/TECOS/.

Researchers at the DTU and the DCRI compared sitagliptin to placebo in 14,724 patients with type 2 diabetes and established cardiovascular disease between December 2008 and July 2012. The median patient follow-up was approximately three years.

The researchers found that among patients with both type 2 diabetes and established cardiovascular disease, adding sitagliptin to usual care did not increase the risk for hospitalization for heart failure or other adverse cardiovascular events.

Concerns about possible links between hormone-based therapies and effects on the pancreas have been raised. In TECOS, acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer were uncommon and not statistically different between groups. Numerically, in the sitagliptin group there were more patients with acute pancreatitis and fewer patients with pancreatic cancer than in the placebo group.

"TECOS provides reassurance that sitagliptin may be used safely to improve blood glucose levels in a diverse group of type 2 diabetes patients at high cardiovascular risk without impacting on rates of cardiovascular complications or heart failure," said Professor Rury Holman of Oxford University, joint chair of the study.

"TECOS is an excellent example of academic and industry collaborative research," said Eric Peterson, M.D., executive director of the DCRI and joint chair of the study.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Duke Medicine. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jennifer B. Green, M. Angelyn Bethel, Paul W. Armstrong, John B. Buse, Samuel S. Engel, Jyotsna Garg, Robert Josse, Keith D. Kaufman, Joerg Koglin, Scott Korn, John M. Lachin, Darren K. McGuire, Michael J. Pencina, Eberhard Standl, Peter P. Stein, Shailaja Suryawanshi, Frans Van de Werf, Eric D. Peterson, Rury R. Holman. Effect of Sitagliptin on Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes. New England Journal of Medicine, 2015; 150608133014007 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1501352

Cite This Page:

Duke Medicine. "Diabetes drug sitagliptin shows no increased risk of heart events." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 June 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150608212609.htm>.
Duke Medicine. (2015, June 8). Diabetes drug sitagliptin shows no increased risk of heart events. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150608212609.htm
Duke Medicine. "Diabetes drug sitagliptin shows no increased risk of heart events." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150608212609.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

RELATED STORIES