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Hunting for traditional food in social media

Date:
June 19, 2015
Source:
University of Oslo
Summary:
Nepenthes is a family of carnivorous plants native to Asia and Australia, with the largest distribution on the islands Sumatra and Borneo. An international team of researchers were originally looking into how climate change would affect highland Nepenthes species, when they stumbled upon information that some species were used for food.
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Nepenthes sticky rice snack.
Credit: Rachel Schwallier, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden

Nepenthes is a family of carnivorous plants native to Asia and Australia, with the largest distribution on the islands Sumatra and Borneo.

An international team of researchers were originally looking into how climate change would affect highland Nepenthes species, when they stumbled upon information that some species were used for food.

They state that the two species most commonly used for food, Nepenthes ampullaria and Nepenthes mirabilis, both belong in the lowlands. Neither seem to be threatened by being harvested and used for food.

By searching on the social networks Flickr, Pinterest, Facebook and Youtube for peruik kera, the local name for the plant, the researchers came in contact with people who knew these traditional snacks. Not only that, the researchers also got an impression of the geographical distribution of the snack.


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Materials provided by University of Oslo. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rachel Schwallier, Hugo J de Boer, Natasja Visser, Rogier R van Vugt, Barbara Gravendeel. Traps as treats: a traditional sticky rice snack persisting in rapidly changing Asian kitchens. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 2015; 11 (1) DOI: 10.1186/s13002-015-0010-x

Cite This Page:

University of Oslo. "Hunting for traditional food in social media." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 June 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150619085003.htm>.
University of Oslo. (2015, June 19). Hunting for traditional food in social media. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 8, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150619085003.htm
University of Oslo. "Hunting for traditional food in social media." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150619085003.htm (accessed May 8, 2017).