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Progesterone supplements do not improve outcomes for recurrent miscarriages, study shows

Date:
November 25, 2015
Source:
University of Birmingham
Summary:
Progesterone supplements in the first trimester of pregnancy do not improve outcomes in women with a history of unexplained recurrent miscarriages, new research shows. The findings mark the end of a five year trial and provide a definitive answer to 60 years of uncertainty on the use of progesterone treatment for women with unexplained recurrent losses.
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New research from the University of Birmingham has shown that progesterone supplements in the first trimester of pregnancy do not improve outcomes in women with a history of unexplained recurrent miscarriages.

The findings, published in The New England Journal of Medicine, mark the end of a five year trial and provide a definitive answer to 60 years of uncertainty on the use of progesterone treatment for women with unexplained recurrent losses.

The study of 826 women with previously unexplained recurrent miscarriage showed that those who received progesterone treatment in early pregnancy were no less likely to miscarry than those who received a placebo. This was true whatever their age, ethnicity, medical history and pregnancy history.

Nearly two thirds of the women in the trial had their baby, whether they had progesterone or the placebo. The live birth rate was 65.8% in the treatment group, and 63.3% in the placebo group.

Though the results of the PROMISE (progesterone in miscarriage treatment) trial will be disappointing to many, it will allow researchers to direct their efforts towards exploring other treatments that can reduce the risk.

Professor Arri Coomarasamy explained, "We had hoped, like many people, that this research would confirm progesterone as an effective treatment. Though disappointing, it does address a question that has remained unanswered since progesterone was first proposed as a treatment back in 1953. Fortunately, there are a number of other positives that we can take from the trial as a whole."

The trial results also showed that there were no significant negative effects of progesterone treatment for women or for their babies. This is important information for women taking progesterone for other reasons, such as fertility treatment, or for those taking part in other trials.

Professor Coomarasamy continued, "It may well be that progesterone supplements have other uses, such as preventing miscarriage in women with early pregnancy bleeding, so it's not the end of the road."

"Furthermore, the PROMISE trial created a solid network of doctors, nurses and midwives across the UK and beyond, all committed to miscarriage research. That wealth of expertise and information will be invaluable as we continue to explore and test other treatments that really can reduce the risk of miscarriage."


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Birmingham. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Arri Coomarasamy, Helen Williams, Ewa Truchanowicz, Paul T. Seed, Rachel Small, Siobhan Quenby, Pratima Gupta, Feroza Dawood, Yvonne E.M. Koot, Ruth Bender Atik, Kitty W.M. Bloemenkamp, Rebecca Brady, Annette L. Briley, Rebecca Cavallaro, Ying C. Cheong, Justin J. Chu, Abey Eapen, Ayman Ewies, Annemieke Hoek, Eugenie M. Kaaijk, Carolien A.M. Koks, Tin-Chiu Li, Marjory MacLean, Ben W. Mol, Judith Moore, Jackie A. Ross, Lisa Sharpe, Jane Stewart, Nirmala Vaithilingam, Roy G. Farquharson, Mark D. Kilby, Yacoub Khalaf, Mariette Goddijn, Lesley Regan, Rajendra Rai. A Randomized Trial of Progesterone in Women with Recurrent Miscarriages. New England Journal of Medicine, 2015; 373 (22): 2141 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1504927

Cite This Page:

University of Birmingham. "Progesterone supplements do not improve outcomes for recurrent miscarriages, study shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 November 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151125233014.htm>.
University of Birmingham. (2015, November 25). Progesterone supplements do not improve outcomes for recurrent miscarriages, study shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151125233014.htm
University of Birmingham. "Progesterone supplements do not improve outcomes for recurrent miscarriages, study shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151125233014.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

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