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Mines researchers develop injectable microwheels to deliver fast, effective treatment for blood clots

Date:
January 6, 2016
Source:
Colorado School of Mines
Summary:
Research demonstrates microscale biomedical devices shaped like wheels can be injected into the body and effectively “roll” to treat areas in need – such as arterial blockages.
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Biomedical microwheel research conducted by members of the Colorado School of Mines Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering has been published in Nature Communications.

The paper, "Surface-enabled propulsion and control of colloidal microwheels," co-authored by CBE Department Head David Marr, Associate Professor Keith Neeves, Postdoc Tonguc Tasci and Associate Professor Paco Herson of the University of Colorado-Denver, demonstrates microscale biomedical devices shaped like wheels can be injected into the body and effectively "roll" to treat areas in need -- such as arterial blockages. "Propulsion at the microscale is akin to swimming though molasses, a challenge biomedical microbots must overcome," said Marr. "The microbots may either mimic microorganisms using flagella or employ artificial methods to direct themselves. Inspired by our shift to cars from animal-based transport, we show that microwheels the size of a single cell can be constructed and powered with magnetic fields."

Marr notes the devices could be assembled using a "ship in a bottle" approach: injected into the body and then assembled into wheels that roll like car tires to the afflicted tissue using low-strength external magnetic fields. The resulting microwheel movement occurs with greatly improved speeds and directional control compared to other propulsion strategies.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Colorado School of Mines. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. T. O. Tasci, P. S. Herson, K. B. Neeves, D. W. M. Marr. Surface-enabled propulsion and control of colloidal microwheels. Nature Communications, 2016; 7: 10225 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms10225

Cite This Page:

Colorado School of Mines. "Mines researchers develop injectable microwheels to deliver fast, effective treatment for blood clots." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 January 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160106110942.htm>.
Colorado School of Mines. (2016, January 6). Mines researchers develop injectable microwheels to deliver fast, effective treatment for blood clots. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 28, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160106110942.htm
Colorado School of Mines. "Mines researchers develop injectable microwheels to deliver fast, effective treatment for blood clots." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160106110942.htm (accessed May 28, 2017).

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