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Let it snow! The science of winter

Report reveals inner worlds of snow and winter, and their importance to humans and ecosystems

Date:
January 14, 2016
Source:
National Science Foundation
Summary:
Winter is changing, becoming less like the cold seasons we may remember. The 'new winter' has consequences far beyond December-to-March. It affects spring and summer, too, including plants' flowering dates -- and species such as hummingbirds that depend on precision flowering times for nectar.
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Researchers have validated a new weather prediction model that uses autumn snowfall to predict winter cold in the United States and Europe.
Credit: Nicolle Rager Fuller/National Science Foundation

Snow -- that icon of winter -- blankets the land with a beautiful silence. Love it or hate it, we all depend on snow. Our year-round water supply largely comes from snowmelt.

But we're not the only ones who need snow.

Species from microscopic fungi to 800-pound-moose require it as much, if not more. They survive the winter by living in nature's igloo: snow.

And spring's profusion of flowers? They're fertilized by nutrients in snow.

If you're planning to skate on a frozen lake or river this winter, ski on a snowy slope, or, when spring arrives, depend on snowmelt to fill your reservoir, you may need to think twice.

A view of the new winter

Winter is changing, becoming less like the cold seasons we may remember. The "new winter" has consequences far beyond December-to-March. It affects spring and summer, too, including plants' flowering dates -- and species such as hummingbirds that depend on precision flowering times for nectar.

In celebration of snow and winter as we know it, and in a look at what winter may be like in the future, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has launched a new special report: Let It Snow! The Science of Winter (www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/snow/).

The report focuses on projects supported largely by NSF's Directorate for Geosciences and Directorate for Biological Sciences/Division of Environmental Biology.

Grants from these areas fund research on subjects as diverse as measuring snowfall; tracking snowstorm "bombs," as whiteouts are known in meteorology; studying animals and plants that live beneath the snow in an ecosystem called the subnivian; searching for snowmelt, or "white gold"; and the bane of winter -- dust from the atmosphere that causes snow to melt before its time.

Go winter storm-chasing, enter nature's igloo

In the report, explore such topics as winter storm-chasing, a conifer tree's view of snow, life in nature's igloo, and where our winters have gone.

Watch a video of snowflakes photographed by a new high-speed camera, and another on the water that's locked in snow and ice: a zero sum game.

As you look out your window at a snow-covered landscape, or perhaps one that has been so in the past -- and even if you live below the snowline -- find out what scientists are learning about winter.

It matters, even if you never see a snowflake.


Story Source:

Materials provided by National Science Foundation. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Cite This Page:

National Science Foundation. "Let it snow! The science of winter: Report reveals inner worlds of snow and winter, and their importance to humans and ecosystems." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 January 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160114121738.htm>.
National Science Foundation. (2016, January 14). Let it snow! The science of winter: Report reveals inner worlds of snow and winter, and their importance to humans and ecosystems. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160114121738.htm
National Science Foundation. "Let it snow! The science of winter: Report reveals inner worlds of snow and winter, and their importance to humans and ecosystems." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160114121738.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

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