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What makes a video game great? There’s now a scientific way to stop GUESSing

Date:
September 19, 2016
Source:
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Summary:
Human factors researchers have developed the Game User Experience Satisfaction Scale (GUESS), a psychometrically validated instrument that measures satisfaction on key factors such as playability, narratives, creative freedom, social connectivity, and visual aesthetics.
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Fortune magazine noted in February 2016 that sales of video games in 2015 in the United States reached $23.5 billion, "a 5% jump over 2014, according to the Entertainment Software Association." More than 1,000 new games are released each year. Although sales and user reviews might point to gamer satisfaction, consensus is lacking in what exactly constitutes a "good" game. Now there is a scientifically validated means of gauging satisfaction, the Game User Experience Satisfaction Scale, or GUESS.

As described in their upcoming paper in Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, human factors researchers Mikki H. Phan and Barbara S. Chaparro of Wichita State University and Joseph R. Keebler of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University developed the GUESS to help game developers and researchers gather quality feedback from playtesting and game evaluations.

The comprehensive multiphase study examined questionnaire responses about more than 450 popular commercial games from more than 600 gamers. Phan et al. found that the GUESS can be used with players at any experience level and with a variety of entertainment game genres to assess satisfaction on nine subscales:

* Usability/playability

* Narratives

* Play engrossment

* Enjoyment

* Creative freedom

* Audio aesthetics

* Personal gratification

* Social connectivity

* Visual aesthetics

Phan and colleagues are gathering data to further validate the GUESS and explore its use across multiple game genres. "We're very excited for practitioners and researchers to start using the validated GUESS," the authors noted. "This tool has the potential to become the standard when measuring video game satisfaction."


Story Source:

Materials provided by Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mikki H. Phan, Joseph R. Keebler, and Barbara S. Chaparro. The Development and Validation of the Game User Experience Satisfaction Scale (GUESS). Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, September 2016 DOI: 10.1177/0018720816669646

Cite This Page:

Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. "What makes a video game great? There’s now a scientific way to stop GUESSing." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 September 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160919094523.htm>.
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. (2016, September 19). What makes a video game great? There’s now a scientific way to stop GUESSing. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 24, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160919094523.htm
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. "What makes a video game great? There’s now a scientific way to stop GUESSing." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160919094523.htm (accessed May 24, 2017).

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