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Therapeutic hypothermia offers no significant benefits for infants or children after in-hospital car

Date:
January 25, 2017
Source:
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
Summary:
In a multicenter, international study of infants and children who suffered cardiac arrest while in the hospital, NIH-funded researchers have found that body cooling, or therapeutic hypothermia, is no more effective than actively keeping the body at a normal temperature, or therapeutic normothermia.
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  In a multicenter, international study of infants and children who suffered cardiac arrest while in the hospital, NIH-funded researchers have found that body cooling, or therapeutic hypothermia, is no more effective than actively keeping the body at a normal temperature, or therapeutic normothermia.

The study is the first to look exclusively at in-hospital cardiac arrests in infants and children in order to compare the two temperature treatments. Earlier trials involving adults who went into cardiac arrest outside of a hospital had found that therapeutic hypothermia improved survival and brain function. However, recent trials in adults and children did not find such improvements when compared with patients whose temperature was actively maintained in a normal temperature range to prevent fever.

Current guidelines recommend either treatment for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in children, as both methods have resulted in equal rates of survival and prevention of brain injury. But out-of-hospital cardiac arrests have different causes and outcomes than in-hospital ones, and the findings of the new study could inform new guidelines for treatment of the latter.

The study included 329 patients between the ages of 2 days and 18 years old who had sustained cardiac arrest while in a hospital. The researchers randomly divided them into two groups and found that children in the group treated with therapeutic hypothermia had the same survival rates and neurobehavioral functioning a year later as those treated by keeping the body at normal temperature.

The research--funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health--was presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Critical Care Medicine and published simultaneously in the January 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study is part of the Therapeutic Hypothermia after Pediatric Cardiac Arrest (THAPCA) trials, the largest examination to date of therapeutic hypothermia in children other than newborns for any health condition.


Story Source:

Materials provided by NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Frank W. Moler, Faye S. Silverstein, Richard Holubkov, Beth S. Slomine, James R. Christensen, Vinay M. Nadkarni, Kathleen L. Meert, Brittan Browning, Victoria L. Pemberton, Kent Page, Marianne R. Gildea, Barnaby R. Scholefield, Seetha Shankaran, Jamie S. Hutchison, John T. Berger, George Ofori-Amanfo, Christopher J.L. Newth, Alexis Topjian, Kimberly S. Bennett, Joshua D. Koch, Nga Pham, Nikhil K. Chanani, Jose A. Pineda, Rick Harrison, Heidi J. Dalton, Jeffrey Alten, Charles L. Schleien, Denise M. Goodman, Jerry J. Zimmerman, Utpal S. Bhalala, Adam J. Schwarz, Melissa B. Porter, Samir Shah, Ericka L. Fink, Patrick McQuillen, Theodore Wu, Sophie Skellett, Neal J. Thomas, Jeffrey E. Nowak, Paul B. Baines, John Pappachan, Mudit Mathur, Eric Lloyd, Elise W. van der Jagt, Emily L. Dobyns, Michael T. Meyer, Ronald C. Sanders, Amy E. Clark, J. Michael Dean. Therapeutic Hypothermia after In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children. New England Journal of Medicine, 2017; 376 (4): 318 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1610493

Cite This Page:

NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. "Therapeutic hypothermia offers no significant benefits for infants or children after in-hospital car." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 January 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170125145744.htm>.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. (2017, January 25). Therapeutic hypothermia offers no significant benefits for infants or children after in-hospital car. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 28, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170125145744.htm
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. "Therapeutic hypothermia offers no significant benefits for infants or children after in-hospital car." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170125145744.htm (accessed May 28, 2017).

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