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Preventing, treating smoking in children and youth

Recommendations from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care

Date:
February 27, 2017
Source:
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Summary:
A first-ever guideline from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care on tobacco use by children and youth aged 5 to 18 years recommends that physicians should play a more active role in the prevention and treatment of cigarette smoking in this age group.
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A first-ever guideline from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care on tobacco use by children and youth aged 5 to 18 years recommends that physicians should play a more active role in the prevention and treatment of cigarette smoking in this age group. The guidelines were published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

In Canadian children and youth between grades 6 and 12, 18% have tried cigarettes, with 3% of children in grade 6 and up to 36% in grade 12. Smoking in adulthood is linked to trying cigarettes as children or youth, with almost 90% of adult smokers having tried cigarettes by age 18.

"Advice from primary care physicians and allied health care professionals is just one tool in the tool kit that society can use in the prevention and treatment of smoking, but it is a crucial tool for helping to reduce and prevent cigarette use among youth," said Dr. Brett Thombs, chair-elect of the task force and chair of the guideline working group. "We have no doubt that doctors can work effectively alongside governments, parents and schools to educate children and youth on the harmful effects of smoking. However, we still need more research to identify the most effective ways for them to do this."

The task force recommends that physicians should ask children and youth (aged 5-18 years) and/or their parents about tobacco use by the child or youth and offer brief information and advice as appropriate during primary care visits to prevent or treat tobacco smoking.

The guideline was developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care, an independent body of primary care and prevention experts who evaluated the strength and quality of evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of behavioural interventions (e.g., information and counselling) applicable to primary care settings.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Canadian Medical Association Journal. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Recommendations on behavioural interventions for the prevention and treatment of cigarette smoking among school-aged children and youth. CMAJ, February 2017 DOI: 10.1503/cmaj.161242

Cite This Page:

Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Preventing, treating smoking in children and youth: Recommendations from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 February 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170227082203.htm>.
Canadian Medical Association Journal. (2017, February 27). Preventing, treating smoking in children and youth: Recommendations from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 28, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170227082203.htm
Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Preventing, treating smoking in children and youth: Recommendations from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170227082203.htm (accessed April 28, 2017).