Science News
from research organizations

Pro-pot arguments fly higher with likely voters

Date:
March 8, 2017
Source:
Cornell University
Summary:
As more states consider legalizing recreational marijuana, a range of arguments for and against legalization is swirling around the national conversation. Which of these arguments resonate most strongly with Americans? It's the arguments that support legalization, according to a new study.
Share:
FULL STORY

Four states legalized recreational marijuana in November, nearly doubling the number of states where recreational pot is legal. As more states consider joining them, a range of arguments for and against legalization is swirling around the national conversation.

But which of these arguments resonate most strongly with Americans? It's the arguments that support legalization, according to a new study co-authored by Jeff Niederdeppe, associate professor of communication in Cornell University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

More than 60 percent of people surveyed in the study said they supported legalization because they agreed with arguments saying it would increase tax revenues, create a profitable new industry, reduce prison crowding and lower the cost of law enforcement.

In contrast, fewer people in the study agreed with anti-legalization arguments emphasizing the damage the policy would have on public health. These reasons included that legalization would increase car accidents, hurt youth's health, expand the marijuana industry, increase crime and threaten moral values.

"The pro arguments are really practical: 'Give us money and jobs. Keep our prison from being overcrowded, make law enforcement's job easier,'" said Niederdeppe. "And the con arguments are a little more ideological: 'This is going to lead to big industry and crime and undermine the fundamental values that make America great.'"


Story Source:

Materials provided by Cornell University. Original written by Melissa Osgood. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Emma E. McGinty, Jeff Niederdeppe, Kathryn Heley, Colleen L. Barry. Public perceptions of arguments supporting and opposing recreational marijuana legalization. Preventive Medicine, 2017; 99: 80 DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.01.024

Cite This Page:

Cornell University. "Pro-pot arguments fly higher with likely voters." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 March 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170308144705.htm>.
Cornell University. (2017, March 8). Pro-pot arguments fly higher with likely voters. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 22, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170308144705.htm
Cornell University. "Pro-pot arguments fly higher with likely voters." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170308144705.htm (accessed May 22, 2017).

RELATED STORIES