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Real-time vapor analysis could improve training of explosive-detecting dogs

Date:
June 28, 2017
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
With a sense of smell much greater than humans, dogs are considered the gold standard for explosive detection in many situations. But that doesn't mean there isn't room for improvement. In a new study, scientists report on a new, more rigorous approach to training dogs and their handlers based on real-time analysis of what canines actually smell when they are exposed to explosive materials.
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With a sense of smell much greater than humans, dogs are considered the gold standard for explosive detection in many situations. But that doesn't mean there isn't room for improvement. In a study appearing in the ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry, scientists report on a new, more rigorous approach to training dogs and their handlers based on real-time analysis of what canines actually smell when they are exposed to explosive materials.

Explosives are often used in terrorist attacks. Dogs trained to detect odors emanating from TNT, nitroglycerin and other explosives are a crucial part of the first-line defense against these incidents. But delivering low-concentration vapor during training sessions is a challenging task. Cross-contamination of training materials with samples from different explosives can skew results and confuse both dogs and handlers. To address these concerns, Ta-Hsuan Ong and colleagues sought to better understand the components within explosive odors that cue a dog's reaction.

The researchers developed a real-time vapor analysis mass spectrometer to more accurately measure the vapor plumes from explosives that trigger a canine response. In field trials, they used the device and found that some mistakes the dogs made were indeed correct identifications. For example, some "blanks" were used that were ostensibly prepared without explosive material, but the dogs indicated an explosive was present. When the researchers used the mass spectrometer on such blanks, they found evidence of explosive vapors, indicating cross contamination occurred or other interferents were present. Based on these findings, the researchers suggest that use of real-time vapor analysis could help differentiate canine mistakes from cross contamination and other issues during training.


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Journal Reference:

  1. Ta-Hsuan Ong, Ted Mendum, Geoff Geurtsen, Jude Kelley, Alla Ostrinskaya, Roderick Kunz. Use of Mass Spectrometric Vapor Analysis To Improve Canine Explosive Detection Efficiency. Analytical Chemistry, 2017; 89 (12): 6482 DOI: 10.1021/acs.analchem.7b00451

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American Chemical Society. "Real-time vapor analysis could improve training of explosive-detecting dogs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 June 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170628131349.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2017, June 28). Real-time vapor analysis could improve training of explosive-detecting dogs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 17, 2024 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170628131349.htm
American Chemical Society. "Real-time vapor analysis could improve training of explosive-detecting dogs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170628131349.htm (accessed June 17, 2024).

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