New! Sign up for our free email newsletter.
Science News
from research organizations

Cancer: Blood sample 24 hours after start of chemotherapy predicts survival

Date:
January 10, 2023
Source:
The University of Bergen
Summary:
Researchers have found a new method that within hours can predict if certain cancer patients will survive after chemotherapy.
Share:
FULL STORY

Researchers from the University of Bergen, Norway, has found a new method that within hours can predict if certain cancer patients will survive or not after chemotherapy.

Acute myeloid leukemia is an aggressive blood cancer with poor survival. Although high rates of initial chemotherapy response, patients often relapse due to the selection and development of chemotherapy-resistant leukemic cells.

"When treating patients with leukemia, it is challenging to quickly follow if the patient is responding to therapy or not says Benedicte Sjo Tislevoll," researcher at the University of Bergen and leader of the new study.

The response to therapy is currently measured after weeks to months of treatment, thereby losing important time. However, an immediate response to chemotherapy can be measured by investigating the functional properties of the leukemic cells.

"Our results show that the protein ERK1/2 increases within the first 24 hours of chemotherapy in patients who have a poor response to therapy. We believe that this protein is responsible for the cancer cells' resistance to chemotherapy and can be used to distinguish responders from non-responders," the researcher says.

"We think that this is an important key in our understanding of cancer, and our aim is to use this information to change treatment early for patients who are not responding to therapy," Tislevoll concludes.


Story Source:

Materials provided by The University of Bergen. Original written by Eli Synnøve Vidhammer. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Benedicte Sjo Tislevoll, Monica Hellesøy, Oda Helen Eck Fagerholt, Stein-Erik Gullaksen, Aashish Srivastava, Even Birkeland, Dimitrios Kleftogiannis, Pilar Ayuda-Durán, Laure Piechaczyk, Dagim Shiferaw Tadele, Jørn Skavland, Baliakas Panagiotis, Randi Hovland, Vibeke Andresen, Ole Morten Seternes, Tor Henrik Anderson Tvedt, Nima Aghaeepour, Sonia Gavasso, Kimmo Porkka, Inge Jonassen, Yngvar Fløisand, Jorrit Enserink, Nello Blaser, Bjørn Tore Gjertsen. Early response evaluation by single cell signaling profiling in acute myeloid leukemia. Nature Communications, 2023; 14 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41467-022-35624-4

Cite This Page:

The University of Bergen. "Cancer: Blood sample 24 hours after start of chemotherapy predicts survival." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 January 2023. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2023/01/230110103405.htm>.
The University of Bergen. (2023, January 10). Cancer: Blood sample 24 hours after start of chemotherapy predicts survival. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 21, 2024 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2023/01/230110103405.htm
The University of Bergen. "Cancer: Blood sample 24 hours after start of chemotherapy predicts survival." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2023/01/230110103405.htm (accessed February 21, 2024).

Explore More
from ScienceDaily

RELATED STORIES