Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Peas With In-Built Weevil Resistance

Date:
May 28, 1998
Source:
CSIRO Australia
Summary:
CSIRO announced today that it has produced genetically modified peas almost one hundred percent resistant to weevils.

CSIRO announced today (Thursday) that it has produced genetically modified peas almost one hundred per cent resistant to weevils, the most damaging pest of Australia’s $100 million-a-year pea crop.

“Currently, growers spend up to $16 million a year on chemical insecticides to control the pea weevils. In our field trials, we’ve shown that the genetically modified peas are 99.5 per cent resistant to weevil attack - no insecticide required,” says Dr TJ Higgins, CSIRO Plant Industry.

“We introduced into the peas a gene found in the common kidney bean which has a natural resistance to these seed-eating weevils.

“This gene produces a protein that blocks the normal digestion of seed contents by weevil larvae, so they don't grow and develop into adults,” Dr Higgins says.

“Weevils can reduce yields by 25 to 30 per cent,” says Dr Higgins. “Any sign of weevil damage will cause the peas to be downgraded in quality, with a corresponding reduction in value - no longer suitable for human consumption, the peas are fit for animal feed only.”

“We’ve conducted field trials in New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia in collaboration with the State Departments of Agriculture.

“We tested agronomic characteristics such as yield, and the genetically modified peas are identical to conventional peas in every way except in their susceptibility to insect attack,” says Dr Higgins. Having shown that the technique is successful in peas, the researchers will now attempt to apply the same method to other important food legumes such as chickpeas, cowpeas and mungbeans.

According to Dr Higgins, the significance of weevil attack is not limited to Australian crops.

“Weevils are particularly severe in developing countries - in Asia, the Indian subcontinent, Africa and South America. Subsistence farmers often need to store their harvested crops under poor conditions,” he says.

“In these countries, a small weevil infestation in a storage bin can lead to near-total crop losses six months later,” says Dr Higgins.

The CSIRO scientists are working in collaboration with scientists from the University of California and the Purdue University. The research is supported by growers through the Grains Research and Development Corporation.

More information from:

Dr TJ Higgins, CSIRO Plant Industry, 02-6246 5063
Katrina Nitschke, Media Liaison, 02-6246 5323, 0417 240 261, katrina.nitschke@pi.csiro.au


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by CSIRO Australia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

CSIRO Australia. "Peas With In-Built Weevil Resistance." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 May 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/05/980528010500.htm>.
CSIRO Australia. (1998, May 28). Peas With In-Built Weevil Resistance. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/05/980528010500.htm
CSIRO Australia. "Peas With In-Built Weevil Resistance." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/05/980528010500.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) — The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sharks Off the Menu and on the Tourist Trail in Palau

Sharks Off the Menu and on the Tourist Trail in Palau

AFP (Sep. 2, 2014) — Tourists in Palau clamour to dive with sharks thanks to a pioneering conservation initiative -- as the island nation plans to completely ban commercial fishing in its vast ocean territory. 01:15 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) — A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) — Researchers say having a cup of coffee then taking a nap is more effective than a nap or coffee alone. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins