Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Sharks Get Porthole Of Opportunity

Date:
April 30, 1999
Source:
Wildlife Conservation Society
Summary:
The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) adopted new restrictions this week to help stop overfishing of large coastal sharks in the Atlantic, based in part on scientific studies conducted by the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), a member of the Ocean Wildlife Campaign.

WCS Helps Save Atlantic Sharks; Swordfish are Next

Related Articles


The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) adopted new restrictions this week to help stop overfishing of large coastal sharks in the Atlantic, based in part on scientific studies conducted by the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), a member of the Ocean Wildlife Campaign.

The rules, part of a sweeping management plan for Atlantic and Gulf Coast fisheries signed into law on April 26, call for major cuts in both commercial and recreational shark-fishing quotas, including a moratorium on 19 shark species considered overfished including longfin mako, Caribbean reef, and dusky sharks. For species not listed, recreational anglers may only keep one shark larger than 4.5 feet per vessel, per day -- in addition to one Atlantic sharpnose shark per person, per day. NMFS also established commercial fishing quotas for porbeagle and blue sharks.

Data compiled by WCS showed that even with such severe restrictions, it will take about 40 years for sharks to rebuild to one-half of their original abundance.

"The shark measures are tough and will cause pain for some time to come, but they are necessary if there is to be any chance of recovering large coastal sharks," said Dr. Ellen Pikitch, director of marine conservation programs for WCS. "The damage that has been done will take decades to undo."

Looking at both basic shark biology and the commercial and recreational landings, WCS found that large coastal sharks are being killed twice as fast as they can reproduce. And, because sharks reproduce just every two to three years for most species and grow slowly, populations are very difficult to recover once depleted. WCS also determined that the federal management plan enacted in 1996 failed to adequately protect sharks.

Last June, after approaching NMFS with these findings, Pikitch was invited as a scientific advisor to submit WCS's plan at a shark recovery workshop. By September, the plan was accepted by NMFS, and adopted as national policy on April 26th.

But Pikitch was quick to note NMFS' failure to enact tougher restrictions for swordfish, which have been dwindling in both size and number for more than two decades. According to Pikitch, NMFS failed to take meaningful steps to rebuild the depleted swordfish stock.

"The U.S. has a real opportunity to be a world leader in swordfish conservation by committing to an effective swordfish recovery program in the international arena, including quota cuts," Pikitch said. This is our best hope for restoring both the health of swordfish stocks and the viability of the U.S. swordfishing industry."

###

The Ocean Wildlife Campaign, a coalition of six conservation groups working to protect "ocean giants," such as sharks, tunas and billfish, from overfishing.

Photos available on-line: http://wcs.org/sharkpic.html


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wildlife Conservation Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Wildlife Conservation Society. "Sharks Get Porthole Of Opportunity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 April 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/04/990430070702.htm>.
Wildlife Conservation Society. (1999, April 30). Sharks Get Porthole Of Opportunity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/04/990430070702.htm
Wildlife Conservation Society. "Sharks Get Porthole Of Opportunity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/04/990430070702.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Galapagos Tortoises Bounce Back, But Ecosystem Lags

Galapagos Tortoises Bounce Back, But Ecosystem Lags

Newsy (Oct. 29, 2014) The Galapagos tortoise has made a stupendous recovery from the brink of extinction to a population of more than 1,000. But it still faces threats. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: The US Will Not 'run and Hide' From Ebola

Obama: The US Will Not 'run and Hide' From Ebola

AP (Oct. 29, 2014) Surrounded by health care workers in the White House East Room, President Barack Obama said the U.S. will likely see additional Ebola cases in the weeks ahead. But he said the nation can't seal itself off in the fight against the disease. (Oct. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Oatmeal Healthy Recipes and Benefits

Oatmeal Healthy Recipes and Benefits

Buzz60 (Oct. 29, 2014) Oatmeal is a fantastic way to start your day. Whichever way you prepare them, oats provide your body with many health benefits. In celebration of National Oatmeal Day, Krystin Goodwin (@krystingoodwin) has a few recipe ideas, and tips on how to kickstart your day with this wholesome snack! Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
GoPro Video Gives a Lion's-Eye View of The Hunt

GoPro Video Gives a Lion's-Eye View of The Hunt

Buzz60 (Oct. 29, 2014) If you’ve ever wondered what getting takeout looks like for lions in Africa, the GoPro video from Lion Whisperer Kevin Richardson will give you a lion’s-eye view of the hunt. Jen Markham has more. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins