Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Social Climbing May Change The Way Your Brain Works

Date:
October 28, 1999
Source:
Georgia State University
Summary:
The latest neuroscience research shows that brains change along with behavior on the social ladder. According to a new study by Georgia State University biologists Don Edwards and Joanne Drummond, dominant and subordinate crayfish react to stressful situations by responding to the same brain chemical in two different ways depending on their changing social status.

The latest neuroscience research shows that brains change along with behavior on the social ladder. According to a new study by Georgia State University biologists Don Edwards and Joanne Drummond, dominant and subordinate crayfish react to stressful situations by responding to the same brain chemical in two different ways depending on their changing social status.

Related Articles


Crayfish brains are often studied by neurobiologists wanting to know more about the role of serotonin, one of several substances known to affect mood and aggression. Crayfish fight a lot. When the fight's over, one becomes dominant over the other. Edwards' and Drummond's research, to be presented this weekend at the meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in Miami, shows that serotonin-containing crayfish nerve cells respond differently to natural stimuli in socially dominant and subordinate animals after a fight.

Previously, Edwards found that the nerve cells that trigger escape behavior are inhibited by serotonin in subordinate crayfish. But these same neurons are made more responsive by serotonin in dominant animals.This may be due to an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory serotonin receptors in the crayfishes' escape nerve cells. These changes in serotonin's effect take about two weeks to develop following the fight that determines the animals' social status, and are largely reversible: if the loser can win, serotonin will revert to being excitatory. This new research indicates that the neural circuitry that excites the serotonin-containing nerve cells, and the patterns of serotonin release in the nervous system, differ in dominant and subordinate animals.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Georgia State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Georgia State University. "Social Climbing May Change The Way Your Brain Works." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 October 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991028070715.htm>.
Georgia State University. (1999, October 28). Social Climbing May Change The Way Your Brain Works. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 5, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991028070715.htm
Georgia State University. "Social Climbing May Change The Way Your Brain Works." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991028070715.htm (accessed March 5, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Raw: Tourists Visit Rare Grey Whales in Mexico

Raw: Tourists Visit Rare Grey Whales in Mexico

AP (Mar. 4, 2015) Once nearly extinct, grey whales now migrate in their thousands to Mexico&apos;s Vizcaino reserve in Baja California, in search of warmer waters to mate and give birth. Tourists flock to the reserve to see the whales, measuring up to 49 feet long. (March 4) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Australian Museum Shares Terrifying Goblin Shark With the World

Australian Museum Shares Terrifying Goblin Shark With the World

Buzz60 (Mar. 4, 2015) The Australian Museum has taken in its fourth-ever goblin shark, a rare fish with an electricity-sensing snout and &apos;alien-like&apos; jaw. Mike Janela (@mikejanela) takes a look. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Hormone Could Protect Against Diabetes And Weight Gain

New Hormone Could Protect Against Diabetes And Weight Gain

Newsy (Mar. 4, 2015) A newly discovered hormone mimics the effects of exercise, protecting against diabetes and weight gain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Prince William Calls for Unified Effort Against Illegal Wildlife Trade

Prince William Calls for Unified Effort Against Illegal Wildlife Trade

Reuters - Entertainment Video Online (Mar. 4, 2015) Britain&apos;s Prince William pledges to unite against illegal wildlife trade on the final day of his visit to China. Rough cut - no reporter narration Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins