Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Frozen Human Cells Restore Nerve Conduction In Animal Model; Method May Find Use In Humans

Date:
February 7, 2001
Source:
Society For Neuroscience
Summary:
Scientists have successfully used frozen human cells taken from nerve tissue to restore nerve conduction in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

Scientists have successfully used frozen human cells taken from nerve tissue to restore nerve conduction in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

“Such cells could potentially be used in humans for a clinical trial in demyelinating disorders, such as multiple sclerosis,” says Jeffery Kocsis, PhD, of the Yale University School of Medicine. The study, funded primarily by the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Multiple Sclerosis Society and the National Institutes of Health, appears in the February 1 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

“This raises the possibility that a patient's own cells may be used to repair demyelinating diseases,” says Moses Chao, PhD, a neurobiologist at New York University School of Medicine.

The most common nervous system disease of young adults after epilepsy, multiple sclerosis (MS) is a life-long ailment of unknown origin that affects some 300,000 Americans. The most common symptoms are blurred vision, awkward gait, numbness and fatigue. MS strikes individuals who are mainly between the ages of 20 and 40. It results in earning losses of about $2 billion annually.

In diseases such as MS, some of the myelin – insulating material of a nerve cell’s axon that sends messages – in the brain or spinal cord is damaged. This leads to various neurological problems. Special cells, known as Schwann cells, make myelin.

In the new study, Kocsis and his colleagues prepared Schwann cells from human nerves taken from amputated limbs. The cells were frozen and stored for weeks to months. The frozen cells were then reconstituted and injected with a fine glass needle into a demyelinated lesion in the rat spinal cord. The researchers found that the human Schwann cells formed relatively extensive myelin in the damaged rat spinal cord and that nerve impulse conduction was improved by the cell transplantation procedure.

Possibly in the future, cells could be harvested and with a nerve biopsy directly from the patient who needs the transplant treatment and grown in larger numbers, making immunosuppressive drugs unnecessary. The scientists caution that it is unclear whether these cells will work as well if transplanted into a large lesion in an MS patient. However, they are encouraged by the observation that the cells have repair potential in animals.

Kocsis’s co-authors include Ikuhide Kohama, MD, PhD; Karen Lankford, PhD; Jana Preiningerova, PhD; Fletcher White, PhD; and Timothy Vollmer, MD; of Yale and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in West Haven, CT. Kohama, Lankford, White, Vollmer and Kocsis are members of the Society for Neuroscience, an organization of more than 28,000 basic scientists and clinicians who study the brain and nervous system. Vollmer can be reached at 203-785-4086. The Society publishes The Journal of Neuroscience.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society For Neuroscience. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society For Neuroscience. "Frozen Human Cells Restore Nerve Conduction In Animal Model; Method May Find Use In Humans." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 February 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/02/010205073808.htm>.
Society For Neuroscience. (2001, February 7). Frozen Human Cells Restore Nerve Conduction In Animal Model; Method May Find Use In Humans. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/02/010205073808.htm
Society For Neuroscience. "Frozen Human Cells Restore Nerve Conduction In Animal Model; Method May Find Use In Humans." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/02/010205073808.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) — An experimental drug used to treat Marburg virus in rhesus monkeys could give new insight into a similar treatment for Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Terrifying City-Dwelling Spiders Are Bigger And More Fertile

Terrifying City-Dwelling Spiders Are Bigger And More Fertile

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) — According to a new study, spiders that live in cities are bigger, fatter and multiply faster. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) — According to a new study, elderly people might have trouble sleeping because of the loss of a certain group of neurons in the brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ramen Health Risks: The Dark Side of the Noodle

Ramen Health Risks: The Dark Side of the Noodle

AP (Aug. 21, 2014) — South Koreans eat more instant ramen noodles per capita than anywhere else in the world. But American researchers say eating too much may increase the risk of diabetes, heart disease and stroke. (Aug. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins