Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Have DNA Lab, Will Travel: Mobile Unit First Of Its Kind

Date:
March 9, 2001
Source:
Texas A&M University
Summary:
In a facility believed to be the first of its kind, a mobile laboratory used to collect DNA material from endangered species is now in operation at Texas A&M University.

COLLEGE STATION - In a facility believed to be the first of its kind, a mobile laboratory used to collect DNA material from endangered species is now in operation at Texas A&M University.

The 28-foot long moving facility, called the Mobile Reproductive Genetics Lab, is being used to gather genetic materials from animals that could ultimately face extinction. If that happens, the DNA could be used to re-introduce the species in the future, says Dr. Duane Kraemer, director of the facility and a researcher in the College of Veterinary Medicine.

"This new lab is a dream we've had for about 15 years," Kraemer says of the new facility. "With it, we are able to go directly to the animal's environment. It's a state-of-the-art lab that can go just about anywhere there's a road."

The lab cost $120,000 and was funded by a matching grant from the Trans Pecos Desert Bighorn Sheep Restoration Society, which is led by Clayton Williams Jr., a Texas A&M alumnus and prominent West Texas businessman. Fittingly, the first field trip for the new lab was to collect DNA from bighorn sheep in the Trans Pecos area of West Texas.

Bighorn sheep, which once numbered in the thousands, are now a threatened species in Texas. The lab was built by the Dodgen Industries of Humboldt, Iowa, which makes mobile medical and dental facilities. "It's like no other we've made," says Bill Ryan, director of the veterinary division of Dodgen. "It's bigger than most and it's got the very best equipment. "It's exciting to think of what Texas A&M will be able to accomplish with this lab. It's really a complete genetic lab on wheels."

The facility is equipped with a surgery room, examining room, recovery area and contains the latest reproductive biotechnology medical equipment, Kraemer said. "As far as we know, this is the first facility of this kind ever built," Kraemer says. "The list of animals facing extinction grows every day. We hope the work we can do in this lab will help preserve those species for future generations to enjoy."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Texas A&M University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Texas A&M University. "Have DNA Lab, Will Travel: Mobile Unit First Of Its Kind." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 March 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/03/010305071728.htm>.
Texas A&M University. (2001, March 9). Have DNA Lab, Will Travel: Mobile Unit First Of Its Kind. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/03/010305071728.htm
Texas A&M University. "Have DNA Lab, Will Travel: Mobile Unit First Of Its Kind." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/03/010305071728.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die

Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die

AP (July 22, 2014) An 80-year-old agave plant, which is blooming for the first and only time at a University of Michigan conservatory, will die when it's done (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
San Diego Zoo Welcomes New, Rare Rhino Calf

San Diego Zoo Welcomes New, Rare Rhino Calf

Reuters - US Online Video (July 21, 2014) An endangered black rhino baby is the newest resident at the San Diego Zoo. Sasha Salama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shark Sightings a Big Catch for Cape Tourism

Shark Sightings a Big Catch for Cape Tourism

AP (July 21, 2014) A rise in shark sightings along the shores of Chatham, Massachusetts is driving a surge of eager vacationers to the beach town looking to catch a glimpse of a great white. (July 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$23.6 Billion Awarded To Widow In Smoking Lawsuit

$23.6 Billion Awarded To Widow In Smoking Lawsuit

Newsy (July 20, 2014) Cynthia Robinson claims R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company hid the health and addiction risks of its products, leading to the death of her husband in 1996. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins