Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Researchers Trace Evolving Pacific Air Chemistry

Date:
March 7, 2001
Source:
National Aeronautics And Space Administration
Summary:
Spring has arrived in Hong Kong and so have research planes, scientists and a lot of equipment. By studying the seasonal airflow from Asia across the Pacific, NASA scientists believe it is an ideal time to collect information used to study how natural and human-induced changes affect our global climate.

Spring has arrived in Hong Kong and so have research planes, scientists and a lot of equipment. By studying the seasonal airflow from Asia across the Pacific, NASA scientists believe it is an ideal time to collect information used to study how natural and human-induced changes affect our global climate.

The Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) experiment will use two specially equipped NASA aircraft to measure gases and identify the chemical makeup of air off the East Asian coast over the Pacific Ocean.

The TRACE-P mission, headed by NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA, starts its 45-day operations this month from Hong Kong and finishes at Yokota Air Force Base near Tokyo.

In addition to a DC-8 from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, and a P-3B from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, VA, satellites and ground stations will play a role, as scientists gather information to plan flight patterns and interpret measurements taken on the aircraft.

"While NASA administers the TRACE-P program, it's important to realize all of the expertise that's necessary to make the measurements on these aircraft," said Dr. Jim Crawford, TRACE-P Deputy Mission Scientist and Langley researcher. "We have to bring together researchers from international universities, other government labs and from within NASA to make an adequate assessment of what's happening over the Pacific."

A major goal of TRACE-P is to understand the chemical makeup and reactions of air coming from Asia. Researchers want to study how the chemical reactions and movement affect the air as it moves away from Asia across the Pacific. With rapid industrialization and increased energy use, mostly in the form of fossil fuel, scientists expect emissions to increase as East Asia continues to develop.

"Out of all the industrialized regions in the world, North America and Europe are at a much higher latitude," Crawford added. "And since air chemistry is driven by sunlight, the Asian emissions happening at a tropical latitude potentially have a very different chemical evolution."

TRACE-P is part of the long series of NASA Global Tropospheric Experiments (GTE) and a follow-up to earlier atmospheric science investigations in 1991 and 1994. These exploratory missions studied the Asian outflow -- air flowing over the continent to and across the Pacific -- and how seasons and geography affect the chemistry and movement of air.

GTE is aimed at a better understanding of worldwide chemistry of the troposphere, which is the part of the atmosphere closest to the Earth's surface. Over the past twenty years, GTE has conducted missions in the Amazon, the Arctic, the tropical Atlantic and the Pacific, to study both natural and man-made processes that determine the troposphere's chemical make-up.

This international research effort is part of NASA's Office of Earth Sciences Enterprise, Headquarters, Washington, DC. The Enterprise is a long-term research effort dedicated to studying the Earth System and how it is changing due to both natural and human-induced processes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Aeronautics And Space Administration. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Aeronautics And Space Administration. "Researchers Trace Evolving Pacific Air Chemistry." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 March 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/03/010306073409.htm>.
National Aeronautics And Space Administration. (2001, March 7). Researchers Trace Evolving Pacific Air Chemistry. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/03/010306073409.htm
National Aeronautics And Space Administration. "Researchers Trace Evolving Pacific Air Chemistry." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/03/010306073409.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

Share This




More Earth & Climate News

Friday, July 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Goma Cheese Brings Whiff of New Hope to DRC

Goma Cheese Brings Whiff of New Hope to DRC

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 24, 2014) — The eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo, mainly known for conflict and instability, is an unlikely place for the production of fine cheese. But a farm in the village of Masisi, in North Kivu is slowly transforming perceptions of the area. Known simply as Goma cheese, the Congolese version of Dutch gouda has gained popularity through out the region. Ciara Sutton reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bill Gates: Health, Agriculture Key to Africa's Development

Bill Gates: Health, Agriculture Key to Africa's Development

AFP (July 24, 2014) — Health and agriculture development are key if African countries are to overcome poverty and grow, US software billionaire Bill Gates said Thursday, as he received an honourary degree in Ethiopia. Duration: 00:36 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Higgins Breaks Record at Mt. Washington

Higgins Breaks Record at Mt. Washington

Driving Sports (July 24, 2014) — Subaru Rally Team USA drivers David Higgins and Travis Pastrana face off against a global contingent of racers at the annual Mt. Washington Hillclimb in New Hampshire. Includes exclusive in-car footage from Higgins' record attempt. Video provided by Driving Sports
Powered by NewsLook.com
Storm Kills Three, Injures 20 at Virginia Campground

Storm Kills Three, Injures 20 at Virginia Campground

Reuters - US Online Video (July 24, 2014) — A likely tornado tears through an eastern Virginia campground, killing three and injuring at least 20. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:  

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile iPhone Android Web
          Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins