Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Bat Sonar And Anti-Submarine Warfare

Date:
April 29, 2002
Source:
Office Of Naval Research
Summary:
Dolphins do it. Big brown bats do it. And sometime soon, the Office of Naval Research hopes its researchers will be able to do it too. Echolocation, that is, and turning the processing of such signals into a system that will enable us to mimic a flying bat’s ability to detect and classify a flying beetle in three dimensions at thirty feet.

Dolphins do it. Big brown bats do it. And sometime soon, the Office of Naval Research hopes its researchers will be able to do it too. Echolocation, that is, and turning the processing of such signals into a system that will enable us to mimic a flying bat’s ability to detect and classify a flying beetle in three dimensions at thirty feet.

ONR’s Bio-Sonar program supports the bat research of Brown University neuroscientist, Jim Simmons. Bats use sonar to find food and avoid obstacles much the way our military sonar systems would like to find and detect submarines and mines. “Bats make sounds, listen to echoes, and then see objects,” notes Simmons. “We want to know what the neurons in the bat's auditory system are doing to process the echoes that allows their brains to ‘see’ an image. We now know that bats have a method of doing synthetic aperture sonar while flying that not only determines the distance and direction of all the objects in a scene, but also reconstructs one specific object’s shape. What’s really incredible is that they can do both simultaneously.”

In Simmons' experiments, the bats are trained to differentiate sounds with the time separation of those sounds shortened to test the bats' response.

“The bats humor us,” says Simmons. “They get mealworms if they behave.”

A major goal of ONR’s bio-sonar research program is to duplicate the ability to differentiate between two echoes that arrive at almost the same time. Today’s electronic sonar processing can differentiate between echoes about 12 millionths of a second apart. Bats have it down to 2 to 3 millionths of a second. Being able to separate such sounds means that bats can tell the difference between objects and shapes that are separated by only about the width of a human hair.

“ONR would like to get naval sonars, both in listening and in processing the return information, a bit more, well, bat-like,” notes ONR’s Harold Hawkins.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Office Of Naval Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Office Of Naval Research. "Bat Sonar And Anti-Submarine Warfare." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 April 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/04/020429073532.htm>.
Office Of Naval Research. (2002, April 29). Bat Sonar And Anti-Submarine Warfare. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/04/020429073532.htm
Office Of Naval Research. "Bat Sonar And Anti-Submarine Warfare." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/04/020429073532.htm (accessed August 2, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Saturday, August 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pyrenees Orphan Bear Cub Gets Brand New Home

Pyrenees Orphan Bear Cub Gets Brand New Home

AFP (Aug. 1, 2014) The discovery of a bear cub in the Pyrenees mountains made headlines in April 2014. Despire several attempts to find the animal's mother, the cub remained alone. Now, the Pyrenees Conservation Foundation has constructed an enclosure. Duration: 00:31 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) Health officials are working to fast-track a vaccine — the West-African Ebola outbreak has killed more than 700. But why didn't we already have one? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) Previous studies have made the link between birth control and breast cancer, but the latest makes the link to high-estrogen oral contraceptives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Rare Whale Fossil Pulled from Calif. Backyard

Rare Whale Fossil Pulled from Calif. Backyard

AP (Aug. 1, 2014) A rare whale fossil has been pulled from a Southern California backyard. The 16- to 17-million-year-old baleen whale fossil is one of about 20 baleen whale fossils known to exist. (Aug. 1) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins