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First Genetic Response In Animal Species To Global Warming

Date:
February 12, 2003
Source:
University Of Alberta
Summary:
For the first time ever, a University of Alberta researcher has discovered that an animal species has changed its genetic make-up to cope with global warming. In the past, organisms have shown the flexibility--or plasticity--to adapt to their surroundings, but this is the first time it has been proven a species has responded genetically to cope with environmental forces.

For the first time ever, a University of Alberta researcher has discovered that an animal species has changed its genetic make-up to cope with global warming. In the past, organisms have shown the flexibility--or plasticity--to adapt to their surroundings, but this is the first time it has been proven a species has responded genetically to cope with environmental forces.

Dr. Stan Boutin, from the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, has been studying a North American red squirrel population in Canada's southwest Yukon for almost 15 years. The squirrels, faced with increasing spring temperatures and food supply, have advanced the timing of breeding by 18 days over the last 10 years—six days for each generation. His findings appear on First Cite and will appear in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society London B next month.

Boutin and his colleagues used an approach called quantitative genetics, long used in agriculture but never before applied to a wild species. Through analytical modelling, the team of researchers was able to sort out how much of the squirrels’ adaptation is due to a plastic, individual response and how much is due to genetics. “This has never been done before,” said Boutin. “Other researchers have stopped at plasticity.”

Phenotypic plasticity is measured by how an individual squirrel can change the timing of a reproductive cycle from one year to the next compared to one generation to the next, which is what Boutin is studying. “Only by having long-term lineages can we get at this research,” he said.

Although this discovery shows the red squirrel is adapting well to its warmer environment, the future is still a concern to scientists especially considering the rapid rate of climate change. Predicting the squirrel's threshold is also impossible, said Boutin, so it is difficult to know if the animal has reached is peak of "adaptation skills." The next step is to look at different components of the genome to see if researchers can pinpoint more closely the set of genes responsible for these changes.

###

Other authors on the paper are Andrew McAdam from the University of Alberta, Denis R้ale, from McGill University, and Dominique Berteaux from the Universit้ du Qu้bec. Research was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada.

The U of A in Edmonton, Alberta is one of Canada's premier teaching and research universities serving more than 33,000 students with 6,000 faculty and staff. It continues to lead the country with the most 3M Teaching Fellows, Canada's only national award recognizing teaching excellence.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Alberta. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Alberta. "First Genetic Response In Animal Species To Global Warming." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 February 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/02/030212071551.htm>.
University Of Alberta. (2003, February 12). First Genetic Response In Animal Species To Global Warming. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/02/030212071551.htm
University Of Alberta. "First Genetic Response In Animal Species To Global Warming." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/02/030212071551.htm (accessed April 19, 2014).

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