Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Test To Find, Recruit Pest-Fighting Bacteria

Date:
March 8, 2004
Source:
USDA/Agricultural Research Service
Summary:
A genetic fingerprinting technique developed by Agricultural Research Service scientists could point the way to new strains of Pasteuria bacteria with potential to biologically control soybean cyst nematodes.

A genetic fingerprinting technique developed by Agricultural Research Service scientists could point the way to new strains of Pasteuria bacteria with potential to biologically control soybean cyst nematodes.

ARS nematologist Greg Noel and colleagues developed the method to help resolve confusion surrounding Pasteuria's taxonomic classification and clarify its parasite-host relationship with soil-dwelling roundworms like the soybean cyst nematode, a crop pest that costs $324 million to $1.4 billion annually in U.S. soy losses.

Since Pasteuria can't be cultured in the lab, researchers seeking to determine its genetic affiliation must resort to extracting DNA from the spore-infected bodies of nematodes. It's a laborious, time-consuming affair that's sometimes prone to DNA contamination by other microbes, according to Noel. He is in the ARS Soybean/Maize Germplasm, Pathology and Genetics Research Unit at Urbana, Ill.

There, rather than using centrifuging, heat and chemicals to obtain Pasteuria DNA, Noel resorted to "glass bead beating." The procedure involves grinding spore-infected nematodes so that any DNA within them is released into a sterile solution. Lab-built molecules called primers are then added. These bind only with Pasteuria DNA--if it's present--and ready the material for amplification by polymerase chain reaction. The DNA can then be cloned and sequenced as Pasteuria's unique, genetic fingerprint.

According to Noel, the method is fast, easy to use, and highly specific. Besides its taxonomic applications, it should aid scientists in identification of Pasteuria species that attack different nematode species. Some of these Pasteuria also complete their life cycles in juvenile nematodes, while others do so in female nematodes.

Either way, the pests face a grisly demise. Within a month, for example, infected soybean cyst nematode females become fragile to the point of crumbling apart, a fate that diminished the pest's population by 87 percent in Noel's field studies at Urbana.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by USDA/Agricultural Research Service. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "New Test To Find, Recruit Pest-Fighting Bacteria." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 March 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040308073847.htm>.
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. (2004, March 8). New Test To Find, Recruit Pest-Fighting Bacteria. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040308073847.htm
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "New Test To Find, Recruit Pest-Fighting Bacteria." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040308073847.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Friday, August 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Visitors Feel Part of the Pack at Wolf Preserve

Visitors Feel Part of the Pack at Wolf Preserve

AP (July 31, 2014) Seacrest Wolf Preserve on the northern Florida panhandle allows more than 10,000 visitors each year to get up close and personal with Arctic and British Columbian Wolves. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Florida Panther Rebound Upsets Ranchers

Florida Panther Rebound Upsets Ranchers

AP (July 31, 2014) With Florida's panther population rebounding, some ranchers complain the protected predators are once again killing their calves. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

AP (July 31, 2014) Sarasota County, Florida health officials have issued a warning against eating raw oysters and exposing open wounds to coastal and inland waters after a dangerous bacteria killed one person and made another sick. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Thousands Flocking to German Crop Circle

Raw: Thousands Flocking to German Crop Circle

AP (July 30, 2014) Thousands of people are trekking to a Bavarian farmer's field to check out a mysterious set of crop circles. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins