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Plant Gene Discovery Could Enhance Plant Growth, Reduce Fertilizer Needs And Phosphate Pollution

Date:
July 28, 2004
Source:
American Society Of Plant Biologists
Summary:
Scientists have uncovered the genes that enable plants to interact with beneficial soil dwelling fungi and to access phosphate delivered to the roots by these fungi -- a first step, they say, toward enhancing the beneficial relationship for crop plants, while reducing fertilizer use and phosphate pollution in the environment.

Scientists at the Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research at Cornell University have uncovered the genes that enable plants to interact with beneficial soil dwelling fungi and to access phosphate delivered to the roots by these fungi -- a first step, they say, toward enhancing the beneficial relationship for crop plants, while reducing fertilizer use and phosphate pollution in the environment.

Discovery of the phosphate-transport genes was announced on July 28, 2004 by Maria Harrison, a senior scientist at the Ithaca, N.Y.-based research institute, during the American Society of Plant Biologists' annual meeting in Lake Buena Vista, Fla.

She said considerable work lies ahead before scientists learn to exploit the genetic discovery and harness the potential of this naturally occurring, symbiotic fungus-plant association, but that the payoff to growers and to the environment could be substantial: more efficient plant growth with less phosphorus-based fertilizer, and a subsequent reduction of phosphate runoff in surface water.

"AM fungi are very efficient at helping plants absorb phosphorus from the soil, and managing this symbiotic association is an essential part of sustainable agriculture" Harrison explained in an interview before plant biologists' meeting. "Phosphorus is a nutrient wherever it goes, and in our lakes and rivers it often nourishes undesirable algae. Agriculture is a major source of phosphate pollution, so anything we biologists can do to improve phosphate uptake in crop plants will make agriculture more sustainable and less harmful to the environment," she predicted. A thorough understanding of how symbiotic fungi work with plants to assist the uptake of phosphorus and other nutrients from the soil is an important goal in plant biology with relevance to agriculture and ecology. Dr. Maria Harrison?s identification of the phosphorus uptake protein in the plasma membrane of the plant is an important step toward this goal. Now her research group is focused on learning which genes in the plant play a role in establishing the symbiotic relationship and of those that regulate the transfer of phosphorus into the plant.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society Of Plant Biologists. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Society Of Plant Biologists. "Plant Gene Discovery Could Enhance Plant Growth, Reduce Fertilizer Needs And Phosphate Pollution." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 July 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/07/040728084527.htm>.
American Society Of Plant Biologists. (2004, July 28). Plant Gene Discovery Could Enhance Plant Growth, Reduce Fertilizer Needs And Phosphate Pollution. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/07/040728084527.htm
American Society Of Plant Biologists. "Plant Gene Discovery Could Enhance Plant Growth, Reduce Fertilizer Needs And Phosphate Pollution." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/07/040728084527.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

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