Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Doctors Closer To Using Gene Analysis To Help Trauma Patients

Date:
March 16, 2005
Source:
University Of Florida
Summary:
A genetic tool with the potential to identify which trauma and burn patients are most likely to become seriously ill has worked consistently in a wide range of experimental clinical settings -- an important hurdle to overcome before the method is routinely used in emergency rooms and intensive care units.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- A genetic tool with the potential to identify which trauma and burn patients are most likely to become seriously ill has worked consistently in a wide range of experimental clinical settings -- an important hurdle to overcome before the method is routinely used in emergency rooms and intensive care units.

Related Articles


In a report published today (March 7) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from eight institutions, including the University of Florida, describe how they were able to consistently analyze which genes are active in patients with serious infections or traumatic injuries.

Researchers want to understand the genetic features that enhance a patient's recovery as well as the elements that cause people to die sometimes weeks after an injury occurs. Identifying those factors could help physicians choose the best treatment, a decision that could mean the difference between life and death, scientists say.

"The vast majority of patients who experience severe trauma or burn injuries actually do well," said Lyle Moldawer, a surgery professor in UF's College of Medicine. "They're resuscitated at the scene, taken to the hospital, have an uneventful recovery and they're discharged. But there's a certain fraction who go on to develop complications that lead to organ failure and death, which is the most common cause of death after traumatic injury -- sepsis and multisystem organ failure. So the goal is to use functional genomics as a tool to identify those patients who, after severe trauma and burn injury, will go on to manifest this multisystem organ failure. It's a way to better characterize the nature of the immuno-inflammatory response to trauma."

Ronald G. Tompkins, M.D., a surgeon and biomedical engineer at Massachusetts General Hospital, is leading the effort to develop standard operating procedures for the care of burn and trauma patients and increase understanding of the body's molecular reactions to injury, including inflammation. The lead research author is J. Perren Cobb, M.D., an associate professor of surgery at Washington University in St. Louis.

Traumatic injuries claim hundreds of thousands of lives each year in the United States. In addition, millions of patients are hospitalized, at an annual cost to society of more than $200 billion. Patients may face a long and difficult recovery period riddled with many potentially fatal complications along the way.

"What we have shown is medical professionals can collect blood and tissue samples from patients, process them at different institutions and get consistent results," said Henry Baker, associate director of the UF Genetics Institute and interim chairman of molecular genetics and microbiology. "For any tool used in clinical medicine, it's important that people are able to get the same answers wherever the tool is being used."

Genomic analyses took place at UF, the Stanford Genome Technology Center and Washington University in St. Louis. Overall data analysis was based at Massachusetts General Hospital at Harvard Medical School.

Specially trained clinical personnel sampled whole blood and other available tissues from more than 200 severely traumatized or burned patients and 23 healthy individuals in an effort to correlate molecular markers with white blood cell behavior, and ultimately, with patient outcome. Studies in healthy patients were conducted at UF, Washington University in St. Louis, the University of Rochester School of Medicine and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Patients with severe traumatic injuries were studied at the University of Washington at Seattle and the University of Rochester.

In the end, scientists could see dramatic changes in genes turning on and off in trauma victims compared with healthy people. Among the trauma patients, researchers say "analytical noise" -- differences attributable to the testing method -- was not significant, suggesting that profiling gene reactions may provide meaningful information to doctors.

The next step is for scientists to continue the experimental procedures in larger multicenter trials, following hundreds of patients over time to describe the molecular profile of healing in response to burns and traumatic injury, researchers say.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Florida. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Florida. "Doctors Closer To Using Gene Analysis To Help Trauma Patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 March 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050310175831.htm>.
University Of Florida. (2005, March 16). Doctors Closer To Using Gene Analysis To Help Trauma Patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050310175831.htm
University Of Florida. "Doctors Closer To Using Gene Analysis To Help Trauma Patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050310175831.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) The new year is coming and nothing will energize you more for 2015 than protein-filled foods. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) gives his favorite high protein foods that will help you build muscle, lose fat and have endless energy. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins