Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Tracking Antimicrobial Resistant Organisms

Date:
April 4, 2005
Source:
USDA / Agricultural Research Service
Summary:
Antibiotics have been used for years to fight bacterial infections, but some bacteria are developing resistance to these antimicrobial drugs. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in Athens, Ga., are tracking antimicrobial resistance and seeking ways to minimize it.

Cells of Salmonella enteritidis change shape as they grow. This scanning electron micrograph shows a mixture of small cells with filaments and very large cells that lack filaments. Small cells arise only during certain growth stages and efficiently contaminate eggs when the time is right.
Credit: Photo by P.J. Guard-Petter, digital colorization by Stephen Ausmus

Antibiotics have been used for years to fight bacterial infections, but some bacteria are developing resistance to these antimicrobial drugs. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in Athens, Ga., are tracking antimicrobial resistance and seeking ways to minimize it.

Related Articles


ARS microbiologist Paula Fedorka-Cray, research leader of the agency's Bacterial Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Resistance Research Unit at Athens, leads a team that is testing for antimicrobial resistance in food-borne microbes.

In these studies, bacterial samples are taken from sick farm animals, healthy farm animals and animal slaughter facilities. The lab's scientists then isolate, test and characterize more than 17,000 bacterial samples a year.

Patterns of resistance are difficult to discern because bacteria don't react predictably and uniformly to antibiotic treatment. For instance, there are many different types of Campylobacter, but each responds differently to antimicrobial drugs.

Another potentially harmful bacterium, Salmonella, has more than 2,400 different types, and each one appears to develop resistance to antibiotics at a different rate. Of all Salmonella types tested from 1997 to 2003, the rate of single-drug resistance has remained relatively stable at 9.5 percent of the samples. However, the number of Salmonella types that are resistant to more than five drugs rose from 11 percent to 20 percent. Those that are resistant to more than 10 drugs rose from a scant 0.8 percent to almost 6 percent.

Fedorka-Cray's research group has developed the nation's largest descriptive database of resistant populations of bacteria recovered from animals over time. The data will be used to determine the probability that resistance will occur or be maintained if antibiotics are used. Changes in antibiotic use in food-animal production are being made in response to the development of resistance to the drugs.

ARS is the U.S. Department of Agriculture's chief scientific research agency.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by USDA / Agricultural Research Service. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

USDA / Agricultural Research Service. "Tracking Antimicrobial Resistant Organisms." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 April 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050325181126.htm>.
USDA / Agricultural Research Service. (2005, April 4). Tracking Antimicrobial Resistant Organisms. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 2, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050325181126.htm
USDA / Agricultural Research Service. "Tracking Antimicrobial Resistant Organisms." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050325181126.htm (accessed March 2, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Monday, March 2, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

500 Snakes Surprise Construction Workers In Canada

500 Snakes Surprise Construction Workers In Canada

Newsy (Mar. 2, 2015) Hundreds of snakes, disturbed by a construction project, were relocated to a wildlife rescue association in Canada. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Going Gluten-Free Could Get You A Tax Break

Going Gluten-Free Could Get You A Tax Break

Newsy (Mar. 2, 2015) If a doctor advises you to remove gluten from your diet, you could get a tax deduction on the amount you spend on gluten-free foods. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Zookeepers Copy Animal Poses In Hilarious Viral Photos

Zookeepers Copy Animal Poses In Hilarious Viral Photos

Buzz60 (Mar. 2, 2015) Zookeepers at the Symbio Wildlife Park in Helensburgh, Australia decided to take some of their favorite animal photos and recreate them by posing just like the animals. Jen Markham (@jenmarkham) has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Heavy Toll as Australian Farmers Struggle Through Drought

Heavy Toll as Australian Farmers Struggle Through Drought

AFP (Mar. 2, 2015) Mounting debts, despair and forced repossessions are taking a heavy toll on farmers in parts of Australia suffering from its worst drought in 100 years. Duration: 02:16 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins