Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists' Pied Piper Approach May Have Found Nemo Faster

Date:
April 25, 2005
Source:
British Information Services
Summary:
Finding Nemo might have been easier had his family used 'pied piper' techniques being developed by an international team of marine biologists led by the University of Edinburgh.

The scientists have been able to lure tropical fish – similar to clownfish like film star Nemo – on to artificial reefs by playing recordings of fish and shrimp noises through underwater speakers. A paper in Science journal suggests the technique could be used to restock depleted fishing grounds near reefs, or to populate newly established conservation areas. The study, which focuses on damselfish and cardinalfish in the Pacific Ocean, also warns that 'unnatural' noises created by shipping and drilling may be depleting fish stocks in sensitive areas.

Previous research has shown that the larvae of coral reef fishes develop in open seas, away from reefs where predators lurk. Despite spending weeks at sea as larvae, potentially scattered over many miles, young coral reef fish eventually seek out a permanent home. A few lucky survivors make it back to their natal reef, grow into adults and produce offspring, but most do not. Studies have hinted that the young fishes' behaviour determines where they end up as much as ocean currents. The Science paper is the first to show that fish take cues from specific animal sounds – in this case, shrimps and other fish – to guide them back to their natal reefs. The tests showed that noisy artificial reefs enticed more fish than silent ones

Stephen Simpson, of the University of Edinburgh's School of Biological Sciences, who is working with scientists in Australia and New Zealand, said: "Coral reef fishes live in dangerous times because of overfishing and damage to their natural habitat. To manage fish effectively, we need to understand their behaviour, particularly during the oceanic stage of their life, when they develop as larvae. We are particularly interested in the importance of sound. Reefs are noisy environments, with the crackle of snapping shrimps and the chatter of fish set against a backdrop of wind, rain and surf, but sound travels well underwater, and fish have great hearing.

"We studied two of the most important reef fish families on noisy artificial reefs compared to silent ones. The damselfish were drawn to the high frequency noise of snapping shrimps, while the cardinalfish responded to both high and low frequency noises produced by shrimps and other fish. This study is a significant step forward in our understanding of their behaviour, which should help us to better predict how we should conserve or harvest populations of reef fishes in the future. It should also alert policy makers to the damage that human activities like drilling and shipping may have on fish stocks because they drown out the natural cues given by animals."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by British Information Services. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

British Information Services. "Scientists' Pied Piper Approach May Have Found Nemo Faster." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 April 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050424200603.htm>.
British Information Services. (2005, April 25). Scientists' Pied Piper Approach May Have Found Nemo Faster. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050424200603.htm
British Information Services. "Scientists' Pied Piper Approach May Have Found Nemo Faster." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050424200603.htm (accessed August 23, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Endangered Red Wolves Face Uncertain Future

Endangered Red Wolves Face Uncertain Future

AP (Aug. 22, 2014) A federal judge temporarily banned coyote hunting to save endangered red wolves, but local hunters say that the wolf preservation program does more harm than good. Meanwhile federal officials are reviewing its wolf program in North Carolina. (Aug. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Farm Resurgence Grows With Younger Crowd

Farm Resurgence Grows With Younger Crowd

AP (Aug. 22, 2014) New England farms are seeing a surge in younger farm hands as the 'buy local' food movement grows across the country. (Aug. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) An experimental drug used to treat Marburg virus in rhesus monkeys could give new insight into a similar treatment for Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Terrifying City-Dwelling Spiders Are Bigger And More Fertile

Terrifying City-Dwelling Spiders Are Bigger And More Fertile

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) According to a new study, spiders that live in cities are bigger, fatter and multiply faster. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins