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Highest Concentration Of Specific Ground Water Contamination In Northeast U.S.

Date:
July 20, 2005
Source:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Summary:
The presence of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a component used to add oxygen to gasoline to meet Clean Air Act standards, has been detected as a contaminant in ground water supplies underlying urban areas, particularly in the northeastern United States. The study is published in the July-August issue of Ground Water.

The presence of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a component used to add oxygen to gasoline to meet Clean Air Act standards, has been detected as a contaminant in ground water supplies underlying urban areas, particularly in the northeastern United States. The study is published in the July-August issue of Ground Water.

Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey examined the occurrence of MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons in ground water throughout the United States and found that nationwide, MTBE was detected as frequently as some other chemicals that have been used for longer periods of time. MTBE was detected more frequently in urban areas compared to other land use types, such as agricultural areas, putting shallow ground water supply in these areas at risk for contamination.

"It is not known if contamination of shallow ground water in urban areas will reach deeper aquifers that are generally used for supplying drinking water," states Michael J. Moran, lead researcher. "Few concentrations of MTBE in ground water exceed the current USEPA Drinking-Water Advisory. This means that most MTBE concentrations in ground water will not cause taste and odor concerns. However, low concentrations of MTBE in drinking water may have unforeseen health consequences."

Past research has shown that possible human health consequences as a result of MTBE contamination in drinking water include carcinogenesis and detrimental reproductive and developmental effects. Researchers say determining the factors related to the occurrence of MTBE, as in this study, may help to reveal the sources and pathways of MTBE to ground water, and the vulnerability of aquifers to MTBE contamination.

###

This study is published in the July-August issue of Ground Water.

Michael Moran, Ph.D. has worked in the ground water field of earth science for 13 years. His degree is in geological engineering, specializing in ground water quality. For the last 10 years, he has worked as a ground water hydrologist for the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey.

About the Journal
Ground Water is the leading international journal focused exclusively on ground water. Since 1963, Ground Water has published a dynamic mix of papers on topics related to ground water including ground water flow and well hydraulics, hydrogeochemistry and contaminant hydrogeology, application of geophysics, groundwater management and policy, and history of ground water hydrology.

About Blackwell Publishing
Blackwell Publishing is the world's leading society publisher, partnering with more than 600 academic and professional societies. Blackwell publishes over 750 journals and 600 text and reference books annually, across a wide range of academic, medical, and professional subjects.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Highest Concentration Of Specific Ground Water Contamination In Northeast U.S.." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 July 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/07/050720065010.htm>.
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. (2005, July 20). Highest Concentration Of Specific Ground Water Contamination In Northeast U.S.. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/07/050720065010.htm
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Highest Concentration Of Specific Ground Water Contamination In Northeast U.S.." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/07/050720065010.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

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